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Arts and Cultural Leadership in Asia ed. by Josephine Caust (review)

Arts and Cultural Leadership in Asia ed. by Josephine Caust (review) BOOK REVIEWS 263 contemporary female practitioner exists in a lineage that “connect[s] her to a long heritage of women in Japan serving as conduits for the divine and charged with sacred rites and performances” (p. 113). Another essay written by Heather Dreyer on three important African women puppet masters—Werewere Liking, Vicky Tsikplonou, and Adama Lucie Baccoby—shows how these significant figures are using their craft to empower and represent women’s issues. Cariad Astles edits a section in which seven well-chosen contemporary artists share their own thoughts on work: these include, among others, the important New York based artist Theodora Skipitares (who has been affected by her work in India and Southeast Asia), South Africa’s Janni Younge who has worked with Handspring and now runs her own company, and Indonesia’s Maria Tri Sulistyani, whose bunraku-like production on the 1965 killings of Indonesian “communists” is discussed. Parmeres Silanka from Kenya, Ana Alvarado from Argentina, and Chia-yin Cheng from Puppet and Its Double in Taiwan also share their intents. These statements illuminate the authors’ artistic agendas. The co-editors end the introduction saying: “We hope that this book is a provocation to further critical and historical scholarship; a beginning not an end” (p. 14). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Arts and Cultural Leadership in Asia ed. by Josephine Caust (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 37 (1) – Jun 20, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS 263 contemporary female practitioner exists in a lineage that “connect[s] her to a long heritage of women in Japan serving as conduits for the divine and charged with sacred rites and performances” (p. 113). Another essay written by Heather Dreyer on three important African women puppet masters—Werewere Liking, Vicky Tsikplonou, and Adama Lucie Baccoby—shows how these significant figures are using their craft to empower and represent women’s issues. Cariad Astles edits a section in which seven well-chosen contemporary artists share their own thoughts on work: these include, among others, the important New York based artist Theodora Skipitares (who has been affected by her work in India and Southeast Asia), South Africa’s Janni Younge who has worked with Handspring and now runs her own company, and Indonesia’s Maria Tri Sulistyani, whose bunraku-like production on the 1965 killings of Indonesian “communists” is discussed. Parmeres Silanka from Kenya, Ana Alvarado from Argentina, and Chia-yin Cheng from Puppet and Its Double in Taiwan also share their intents. These statements illuminate the authors’ artistic agendas. The co-editors end the introduction saying: “We hope that this book is a provocation to further critical and historical scholarship; a beginning not an end” (p. 14).

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 20, 2020

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