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Article Accretion and Article Creation in Southern Oceanic

Article Accretion and Article Creation in Southern Oceanic John Lynch university of the south pacific Very few Southern Oceanic languages retain the Proto-Oceanic articles as articles per se. Some have lost them altogether. In many others, they seem to have developed as proclitics or pre²xes that are today only marginally productive. On the other hand, some of the languages in this subgroup have created new articles or article-like pre²xes. I will argue that the loss of the articles, or the marginalizing of an erstwhile productive system of pre²xes, may have been a quite recent phenomenon, and may thus represent parallel developments rather than shared innovations. 1. INTRODUCTION. Proto-Oceanic seems to have had a number of articles. The following are mentioned in Lynch, Ross, and Crowley (to appear, chap. 4), apart from *dri, which is discussed in 2.2.2: (1) *e, *i *qa *dri *na, *a *ta personal (*e phrase-initial? *i phrase-internal?) personal feminine common nonhuman (no de²nitive allomorphic statement) common nonhuman Following Crowley (1985), I assume that other nouns--generally those with human nonpersonal or animate reference--were zero-marked in Proto-Oceanic. Very few languages in Southern Oceania (Vanuatu and New Caledonia) retain these articles as free-standing articles. Many New Caledonian languages have a number of articles, but most of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Article Accretion and Article Creation in Southern Oceanic

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 40 (2) – Jan 12, 2001

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9421
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Abstract

John Lynch university of the south pacific Very few Southern Oceanic languages retain the Proto-Oceanic articles as articles per se. Some have lost them altogether. In many others, they seem to have developed as proclitics or pre²xes that are today only marginally productive. On the other hand, some of the languages in this subgroup have created new articles or article-like pre²xes. I will argue that the loss of the articles, or the marginalizing of an erstwhile productive system of pre²xes, may have been a quite recent phenomenon, and may thus represent parallel developments rather than shared innovations. 1. INTRODUCTION. Proto-Oceanic seems to have had a number of articles. The following are mentioned in Lynch, Ross, and Crowley (to appear, chap. 4), apart from *dri, which is discussed in 2.2.2: (1) *e, *i *qa *dri *na, *a *ta personal (*e phrase-initial? *i phrase-internal?) personal feminine common nonhuman (no de²nitive allomorphic statement) common nonhuman Following Crowley (1985), I assume that other nouns--generally those with human nonpersonal or animate reference--were zero-marked in Proto-Oceanic. Very few languages in Southern Oceania (Vanuatu and New Caledonia) retain these articles as free-standing articles. Many New Caledonian languages have a number of articles, but most of

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 12, 2001

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