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Are Coal and Colonies Really Crucial? Kenneth Pomeranz and the Great Divergence

Are Coal and Colonies Really Crucial? Kenneth Pomeranz and the Great Divergence p. h. h. vries University of Leiden . . . everywhere we go, there is nothing growing in the ground, just coal and iron. . . . ¯ --the Japanese politician Okubo, member of the Iwakura Tomomi mission, talking about his visit to Britain in 1871. Quoted in P. Duus, Modern Japan, 2nd ed. (Boston, 1998), p. 96. . . . a country possessing very considerable advantages in machinery and skill, and which may therefore be enabled to manufacture commodities with much less labour than her neighbours, may in return for such commodities import a por tion of the corn required for its consumption, even if its land were more fertile and corn could be grown with less labour than in the country from which it was imported. --D. Ricardo, On the Principle of Political Economy and Taxation, ed. by R. M. Hartwell (Harmondsworth, 1971), p. 154. * I would like to thank professor Wim Blockmans for his intelligent comments on the first draft of this essay. Journal of World History, Vol. 12, No. 2 © 2001 by University of Hawai`i Press journal of world history, fall 2001 O b l i g atory Reading Pomeranz's The Great http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Are Coal and Colonies Really Crucial? Kenneth Pomeranz and the Great Divergence

Journal of World History , Volume 12 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

p. h. h. vries University of Leiden . . . everywhere we go, there is nothing growing in the ground, just coal and iron. . . . ¯ --the Japanese politician Okubo, member of the Iwakura Tomomi mission, talking about his visit to Britain in 1871. Quoted in P. Duus, Modern Japan, 2nd ed. (Boston, 1998), p. 96. . . . a country possessing very considerable advantages in machinery and skill, and which may therefore be enabled to manufacture commodities with much less labour than her neighbours, may in return for such commodities import a por tion of the corn required for its consumption, even if its land were more fertile and corn could be grown with less labour than in the country from which it was imported. --D. Ricardo, On the Principle of Political Economy and Taxation, ed. by R. M. Hartwell (Harmondsworth, 1971), p. 154. * I would like to thank professor Wim Blockmans for his intelligent comments on the first draft of this essay. Journal of World History, Vol. 12, No. 2 © 2001 by University of Hawai`i Press journal of world history, fall 2001 O b l i g atory Reading Pomeranz's The Great

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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