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Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest (review)

Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest (review) the contemporary pacific · 23:1 (2011) Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest, by John Barker. Peterborough, on: Broadview Press, 2008. isbn 9781-4426-0105-5, x + 229 pages, illustrations, plates, photos (some color), references, index. Paper, c$29.95. The Maisin live on Collingwood Bay, Oro Province, on the southeast coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG). When Barker first began studying them in 1981, Maisin thought of themselves as poor and their villages as "backward" and "dirty," and they were open to the possibility of logging. But as PNG communities became increasingly distrustful of overseas companies, Maisin became more uncertain as to which development path to pursue. By 1994, the consensus was against commercial logging. Beginning around that time, secret deals were made--by urbanized Maisin, by the premier of the province, by unidentified parties in collusion with the national government--to use the forest for one development scheme or other, without seeking the approval of traditional landowners. The Maisin would spend four years in court defeating the last such scheme and establishing their right to do with their land as they pleased. From 1996 onward, they did so under the umbrella of the Maisin Integrated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 23 (1) – Mar 26, 2011

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 23:1 (2011) Ancestral Lines: The Maisin of Papua New Guinea and the Fate of the Rainforest, by John Barker. Peterborough, on: Broadview Press, 2008. isbn 9781-4426-0105-5, x + 229 pages, illustrations, plates, photos (some color), references, index. Paper, c$29.95. The Maisin live on Collingwood Bay, Oro Province, on the southeast coast of Papua New Guinea (PNG). When Barker first began studying them in 1981, Maisin thought of themselves as poor and their villages as "backward" and "dirty," and they were open to the possibility of logging. But as PNG communities became increasingly distrustful of overseas companies, Maisin became more uncertain as to which development path to pursue. By 1994, the consensus was against commercial logging. Beginning around that time, secret deals were made--by urbanized Maisin, by the premier of the province, by unidentified parties in collusion with the national government--to use the forest for one development scheme or other, without seeking the approval of traditional landowners. The Maisin would spend four years in court defeating the last such scheme and establishing their right to do with their land as they pleased. From 1996 onward, they did so under the umbrella of the Maisin Integrated

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 26, 2011

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