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An Introductory Course in Korean (review)

An Introductory Course in Korean (review) BOOK REVIEWS105 clearly is to teach Chinese orthography (Hanmun) rather than Korean orthography (Unmun). There are no glossaries of words written in han'gül, nor are there any notes to explain Korean grammar. Also, in the sections where the alternative forms of selected radicals are given, one wonders why a Korean name for the radical was not provided. Finally a separate list of radicals might have been useful. Put together, these books, if mastered, should provide a student with a solid foundation on which to build. Texts especially designed to teach the reading of Korean to non-Koreans have long been a need. One hopes that Lukoff will have the opportunity to improve and expand these works into a graduated set of texts to meet this need. Gerard F. Kennedy Kent State University An Introductory Course in Korean, by Fred Lukoff. Seoul: Yonsei University Press, 1982. Distributed in the United States by the University of Washington Press, Seattle, xxx, 488 pp. $14.50. The number of native speakers of Korean in the Korean peninsula and abroad today is said to be slightly in excess of 50 million. It is almost incredible that there is not a single modern Korean grammar available http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

An Introductory Course in Korean (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 30, 1984

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1529-1529
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS105 clearly is to teach Chinese orthography (Hanmun) rather than Korean orthography (Unmun). There are no glossaries of words written in han'gül, nor are there any notes to explain Korean grammar. Also, in the sections where the alternative forms of selected radicals are given, one wonders why a Korean name for the radical was not provided. Finally a separate list of radicals might have been useful. Put together, these books, if mastered, should provide a student with a solid foundation on which to build. Texts especially designed to teach the reading of Korean to non-Koreans have long been a need. One hopes that Lukoff will have the opportunity to improve and expand these works into a graduated set of texts to meet this need. Gerard F. Kennedy Kent State University An Introductory Course in Korean, by Fred Lukoff. Seoul: Yonsei University Press, 1982. Distributed in the United States by the University of Washington Press, Seattle, xxx, 488 pp. $14.50. The number of native speakers of Korean in the Korean peninsula and abroad today is said to be slightly in excess of 50 million. It is almost incredible that there is not a single modern Korean grammar available

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1984

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