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An Historical Perspective of Helping Practices Associated with Birth, Marriage and Death Among Chamorros in Guam (review)

An Historical Perspective of Helping Practices Associated with Birth, Marriage and Death Among... the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 returned to her home in Guam to study the changes in traditional forms of reciprocity that have occurred as a consequence of rapid westernization. She considers this research the sequel to Thompson's book, Guam and Its People, published in 1947. The study of gift exchange and reciprocal behavior in Oceania has its own tradition, with numerous examples in Micronesia demonstrating how these adapt to ever-changing social and political contexts. Guam has experienced waves of colonizers beginning in the 1500s and although many Chamorro cultural practices have been altered as a result, the principle of reciprocity continues to function as a major influence on behavior. Among families and their networks, the system of reciprocity not only provides members with a sense of social support, but also outlines prescribed avenues of social interaction. As a way to understand reciprocity and its impact on everyday life, Iyechad centers her discussion around a core cultural practice known as chenchule. This refers to the action of giving a gift or donation during major life events or other meaningful family celebrations. The strength of the book is in the descriptive material in chapters on marriage, birth, and death, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

An Historical Perspective of Helping Practices Associated with Birth, Marriage and Death Among Chamorros in Guam (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 14 (2) – Jan 7, 2002

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2002 returned to her home in Guam to study the changes in traditional forms of reciprocity that have occurred as a consequence of rapid westernization. She considers this research the sequel to Thompson's book, Guam and Its People, published in 1947. The study of gift exchange and reciprocal behavior in Oceania has its own tradition, with numerous examples in Micronesia demonstrating how these adapt to ever-changing social and political contexts. Guam has experienced waves of colonizers beginning in the 1500s and although many Chamorro cultural practices have been altered as a result, the principle of reciprocity continues to function as a major influence on behavior. Among families and their networks, the system of reciprocity not only provides members with a sense of social support, but also outlines prescribed avenues of social interaction. As a way to understand reciprocity and its impact on everyday life, Iyechad centers her discussion around a core cultural practice known as chenchule. This refers to the action of giving a gift or donation during major life events or other meaningful family celebrations. The strength of the book is in the descriptive material in chapters on marriage, birth, and death,

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2002

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