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An Approach to Comparative Phenomenology: Nishida's Place of Nothingness and Merleau-Ponty's Negativity

An Approach to Comparative Phenomenology: Nishida's Place of Nothingness and... <p>Abstract:</p><p>The Nishidian "pure experience" as well as its further development as acting intuition on the <i>basho</i> is in tune with phenomenology. In this context and based on the phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty&apos;s interest in the immense "thinking literature" of the East, as well as in the phenomenological orientation of the Kyoto School formed around the figure of Nishida Kitarō, a comparative approach between the two will be established, taking their respective conceptions of <i>mu</i> (nothingness) and <i>creux</i> (hollow), as the dialectical nucleus to understand self and world in a non-dualistic manner. It is my claim that Nishida and Merleau-Ponty shed light on another conception of identity as opened to the other. In this evolving identity, receptiveness works as an "in-between" as well as a silence that constitutes the passivity that activity integrates, that is, existence: a self-awakening to a relational philosophy centered in the depths of the self in the flesh or <i>basho</i>.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

An Approach to Comparative Phenomenology: Nishida&apos;s Place of Nothingness and Merleau-Ponty&apos;s Negativity

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>The Nishidian "pure experience" as well as its further development as acting intuition on the <i>basho</i> is in tune with phenomenology. In this context and based on the phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty&apos;s interest in the immense "thinking literature" of the East, as well as in the phenomenological orientation of the Kyoto School formed around the figure of Nishida Kitarō, a comparative approach between the two will be established, taking their respective conceptions of <i>mu</i> (nothingness) and <i>creux</i> (hollow), as the dialectical nucleus to understand self and world in a non-dualistic manner. It is my claim that Nishida and Merleau-Ponty shed light on another conception of identity as opened to the other. In this evolving identity, receptiveness works as an "in-between" as well as a silence that constitutes the passivity that activity integrates, that is, existence: a self-awakening to a relational philosophy centered in the depths of the self in the flesh or <i>basho</i>.</p>

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 10, 2018

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