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America's Parallel (review)

America's Parallel (review) 108BOOK REVIEWS America's Parallel, by Michael C. Sandusky. Alexandria, Virginia: Old Dominion Press, 1983. Illustrated with cartoons, photographs, and maps, xxiv, 420 pp. $19.95. The roots of the Korean tragedy can be traced to the partition of the Korean peninsula in 1945, for this partition led to the emergence of two ideologically polarized states, which within a few years became embroiled in a fratricidal civil war. That three-year conflict not only devastated the peninsula, inflicted millions of casualties on the Korean people, and sowed seeds of mutual distrust and enmity that have continued to bear fruit to this day, it also exacted a heavy price from the United States, China, and other nations in terms of lives, treasures, and opportunities lost. The inconclusiveness with which the conflict was brought to an end, the emergence of an entangling network of military alliances involving major powers, and the persistence of tensions in the peninsula mean that the consequences of the Korean partition have yet to be liquidated. All this underscores the importance of asking anew why and how the partition came about. Michael C. Sandusky, a senior civilian executive in the U.S. Department of the Army with many years of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Korean Studies University of Hawai'I Press

America's Parallel (review)

Korean Studies , Volume 8 (1) – Mar 30, 1984

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1529-1529
Publisher site
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Abstract

108BOOK REVIEWS America's Parallel, by Michael C. Sandusky. Alexandria, Virginia: Old Dominion Press, 1983. Illustrated with cartoons, photographs, and maps, xxiv, 420 pp. $19.95. The roots of the Korean tragedy can be traced to the partition of the Korean peninsula in 1945, for this partition led to the emergence of two ideologically polarized states, which within a few years became embroiled in a fratricidal civil war. That three-year conflict not only devastated the peninsula, inflicted millions of casualties on the Korean people, and sowed seeds of mutual distrust and enmity that have continued to bear fruit to this day, it also exacted a heavy price from the United States, China, and other nations in terms of lives, treasures, and opportunities lost. The inconclusiveness with which the conflict was brought to an end, the emergence of an entangling network of military alliances involving major powers, and the persistence of tensions in the peninsula mean that the consequences of the Korean partition have yet to be liquidated. All this underscores the importance of asking anew why and how the partition came about. Michael C. Sandusky, a senior civilian executive in the U.S. Department of the Army with many years of

Journal

Korean StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1984

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