Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Agriculture and Pastoralism in the Late Bronze and Iron Age, North West Frontier Province, Pakistan (review)

Agriculture and Pastoralism in the Late Bronze and Iron Age, North West Frontier Province,... book reviews In short, Australian archaeologists are, generally speaking, quite explicit about promoting a left-liberal social justice agenda. While I have no doubt that most of my archaeological colleagues in the United States are liberals with similar perspectives on social justice, my observation of them in formal settings such as the SAA suggests neither they as individuals nor the organizations such as SAA that represent them seek to advance such matters as assertively as we do in Australia. Why is that? While I think the issue ties back to my arguments about visions of nation, it may also come down to some more nebulous matter of national ``character'' or ``temperament'' that makes Australians approach such matters more bluntly or pragmatically than our U.S. colleagues (but probably similarly to those in Canada or New Zealand, who tend to be just as plain-speaking). Whether or not such a notion stands up to scrutiny, I agree the book remains at the cutting edge internationally. Read it and see what you think! REFERENCES CITED Harrison, R., J. Mcdonald, and P. Veth in press Archaeology, claimant connection to sites and native title. Australian Aboriginal Studies 2005/1. Lilley, I. 2000a Professional attitudes to indigenous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Agriculture and Pastoralism in the Late Bronze and Iron Age, North West Frontier Province, Pakistan (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 45 (1) – Mar 27, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/agriculture-and-pastoralism-in-the-late-bronze-and-iron-age-north-west-MAO7p0lWH3
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

book reviews In short, Australian archaeologists are, generally speaking, quite explicit about promoting a left-liberal social justice agenda. While I have no doubt that most of my archaeological colleagues in the United States are liberals with similar perspectives on social justice, my observation of them in formal settings such as the SAA suggests neither they as individuals nor the organizations such as SAA that represent them seek to advance such matters as assertively as we do in Australia. Why is that? While I think the issue ties back to my arguments about visions of nation, it may also come down to some more nebulous matter of national ``character'' or ``temperament'' that makes Australians approach such matters more bluntly or pragmatically than our U.S. colleagues (but probably similarly to those in Canada or New Zealand, who tend to be just as plain-speaking). Whether or not such a notion stands up to scrutiny, I agree the book remains at the cutting edge internationally. Read it and see what you think! REFERENCES CITED Harrison, R., J. Mcdonald, and P. Veth in press Archaeology, claimant connection to sites and native title. Australian Aboriginal Studies 2005/1. Lilley, I. 2000a Professional attitudes to indigenous

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 27, 2006

There are no references for this article.