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Adorning the World: Art of the Marquesas Islands (review)

Adorning the World: Art of the Marquesas Islands (review) the contemporary pacific · 18:2 (2006) preted within metropolitan museums continues to provoke lively debate and public interest. Moving forward twenty years, a visitor to the African collections of both the American Museum of Natural History and the Metropolitan Museum of Art might be surprised to find that these galleries are still perfect illustrations of Danto's discussion. The amnh African galleries reconstruct African habitats and peoples in "life-like" tableaux, or group artifacts together in functional and regional categories. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, African art is displayed in reverent, timeless darkness, individual pieces on stark pedestals or in glass cases, spotlit from above. However, the Oceanic collections are displayed somewhat contrarily in both museums, provoking us to question our classifications of art and artifact and the contexts usually associated with them. The amnh Margaret Mead Hall of Pacific Peoples, while organized according to cultural areas and functional themes, is also strikingly modernist in its style of presentation. Divided by evocative panels of color, the central axis of the hall is formed around a large replica Easter Island head, spotlit dramatically as "art," a concept that, in turn, following Mead's explicit intention, becomes the conceptual focus of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Adorning the World: Art of the Marquesas Islands (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 27, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 18:2 (2006) preted within metropolitan museums continues to provoke lively debate and public interest. Moving forward twenty years, a visitor to the African collections of both the American Museum of Natural History and the Metropolitan Museum of Art might be surprised to find that these galleries are still perfect illustrations of Danto's discussion. The amnh African galleries reconstruct African habitats and peoples in "life-like" tableaux, or group artifacts together in functional and regional categories. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, African art is displayed in reverent, timeless darkness, individual pieces on stark pedestals or in glass cases, spotlit from above. However, the Oceanic collections are displayed somewhat contrarily in both museums, provoking us to question our classifications of art and artifact and the contexts usually associated with them. The amnh Margaret Mead Hall of Pacific Peoples, while organized according to cultural areas and functional themes, is also strikingly modernist in its style of presentation. Divided by evocative panels of color, the central axis of the hall is formed around a large replica Easter Island head, spotlit dramatically as "art," a concept that, in turn, following Mead's explicit intention, becomes the conceptual focus of the

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 27, 2006

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