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About the Artist: Shigeyuki Kihara

About the Artist: Shigeyuki Kihara Shigeyuki Kihara is a visual and performance artist based in Auckland, New Zealand. The recipient in 2003 of Creative New Zealand Art Council's Emerging Pacific Island Artist Award, her cutting-edge work challenges cultural stereotypes and dominant norms of sexuality and gender. Crossing borders is integral to Kihara's life. She grew up with a Japanese father and Samoan mother, and in adolescence began occupying the Samoan space (vä) of a Fa`afafine--a liminal Photo by Ken Mayer gender category best translated as a male who identifies as a woman. Kihara's first acclaim came in 2000 when her exhibition Teuanoa`i: Adorn to Excess (twenty-six t-shirts satirizing corporate logos) created a sensation and was purchased by New Zealand's National Museum Te Papa Tongarewa. Her next work re-appropriated ethnographic images of Polynesians with modern consumer items through the medium of paper collage (Black Sunday, 2002) and later focused on photographic self-portraits where she posed as Samoan Goddesses (Fale Aitu: House of Spirits, 2003) and deities from Samoan folklore (Vavau: Tales from Ancient Samoa, 2004). Emulating the genre of velvet paintings, these photographs express a double entendre as they are intended to honor traditional Samoan culture while subverting a Western gaze that exoticizes images http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

About the Artist: Shigeyuki Kihara

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 19 (1) – Jan 17, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Shigeyuki Kihara is a visual and performance artist based in Auckland, New Zealand. The recipient in 2003 of Creative New Zealand Art Council's Emerging Pacific Island Artist Award, her cutting-edge work challenges cultural stereotypes and dominant norms of sexuality and gender. Crossing borders is integral to Kihara's life. She grew up with a Japanese father and Samoan mother, and in adolescence began occupying the Samoan space (vä) of a Fa`afafine--a liminal Photo by Ken Mayer gender category best translated as a male who identifies as a woman. Kihara's first acclaim came in 2000 when her exhibition Teuanoa`i: Adorn to Excess (twenty-six t-shirts satirizing corporate logos) created a sensation and was purchased by New Zealand's National Museum Te Papa Tongarewa. Her next work re-appropriated ethnographic images of Polynesians with modern consumer items through the medium of paper collage (Black Sunday, 2002) and later focused on photographic self-portraits where she posed as Samoan Goddesses (Fale Aitu: House of Spirits, 2003) and deities from Samoan folklore (Vavau: Tales from Ancient Samoa, 2004). Emulating the genre of velvet paintings, these photographs express a double entendre as they are intended to honor traditional Samoan culture while subverting a Western gaze that exoticizes images

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 17, 2007

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