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About the Artist: Natalie Robertson

About the Artist: Natalie Robertson Natalie Robertson (Ngāti Porou, Clann Dhònn chaidh) is an Aotearoa/New Zealand pho tographer, video artist, and senior lec- turer at Auckland University of Technology whose work has been exhibited at the Musée du Quai Branly (Paris), Museo Nacional de las Culturas (Mexico City), Musée de la Civilisation (Québec), and Cuba Casa de la Cultura de Tulum (Havana), as well as in Germany, China, Brazil, the United Kingdom, the United States, New Caledonia, Australia, Photo by Moana Nepia and Aotearoa/New Zealand. Whether docu- menting the effects of modern agricultural practices on the natural environment, observing intimate rituals of care and communal responsibility, or tracing tribal pathways along rivers from aerial drone cameras, Robertson draws on both customary and contem- porary ways of seeing and histories of storytelling that connect people to places and to one another. Robertson’s work may also be understood in terms of what she describes as a “gap between what is real and what is imagined,” as “the distance between what is now, and what will be” in “the wing-beat of a piwakawaka, a fantail.” Moments captured photo- graphically in this way reveal as much about creative potential and imagi- nation as they do about social concern. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

About the Artist: Natalie Robertson

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

Natalie Robertson (Ngāti Porou, Clann Dhònn chaidh) is an Aotearoa/New Zealand pho tographer, video artist, and senior lec- turer at Auckland University of Technology whose work has been exhibited at the Musée du Quai Branly (Paris), Museo Nacional de las Culturas (Mexico City), Musée de la Civilisation (Québec), and Cuba Casa de la Cultura de Tulum (Havana), as well as in Germany, China, Brazil, the United Kingdom, the United States, New Caledonia, Australia, Photo by Moana Nepia and Aotearoa/New Zealand. Whether docu- menting the effects of modern agricultural practices on the natural environment, observing intimate rituals of care and communal responsibility, or tracing tribal pathways along rivers from aerial drone cameras, Robertson draws on both customary and contem- porary ways of seeing and histories of storytelling that connect people to places and to one another. Robertson’s work may also be understood in terms of what she describes as a “gap between what is real and what is imagined,” as “the distance between what is now, and what will be” in “the wing-beat of a piwakawaka, a fantail.” Moments captured photo- graphically in this way reveal as much about creative potential and imagi- nation as they do about social concern.

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 3, 2019

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