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Abandon All Hope of Fruition: Critical Notes on Engaged Buddhism

Abandon All Hope of Fruition: Critical Notes on Engaged Buddhism : Critical Notes on Engaged Buddhism Glenn R. Willis Misericordia University recent articulations of buddhist ethical confidence: gombrich, macy, king, loy In the pages below, I wish to examine some recent Buddhist expressions of strong ethical and epistemological confidence. To do this work, I turn first to several Buddhist reflections on the theme of hope—hardly a prominent Buddhist theme, but one that may help to illustrate what is new, and what is not, in recent Buddhist ethical thinking. Buddhist ethical investigations of our social and economic futures are in some conflict with the soteriological orientation toward the present moment in the Pali canon. In the Samiddhi Sutta, a deva exhorts the youthful bhikkhu Samiddhi not to waste his life: “You are young, bhikkhu, to have left the world, black-haired, with the bloom of youth. In your youthful prime you do not enjoy the pleasures of the senses. Get your fill, bhikkhu, of human pleasures. Don’t reject the present moment to pursue what time will bring.” Samiddhi answers: “I . . . do not reject the present moment to pursue what time will bring. I reject what time will bring to pursue the present moment.”1 Likewise, the Arañña Sutta, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Abandon All Hope of Fruition: Critical Notes on Engaged Buddhism

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 37 – Oct 28, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

: Critical Notes on Engaged Buddhism Glenn R. Willis Misericordia University recent articulations of buddhist ethical confidence: gombrich, macy, king, loy In the pages below, I wish to examine some recent Buddhist expressions of strong ethical and epistemological confidence. To do this work, I turn first to several Buddhist reflections on the theme of hope—hardly a prominent Buddhist theme, but one that may help to illustrate what is new, and what is not, in recent Buddhist ethical thinking. Buddhist ethical investigations of our social and economic futures are in some conflict with the soteriological orientation toward the present moment in the Pali canon. In the Samiddhi Sutta, a deva exhorts the youthful bhikkhu Samiddhi not to waste his life: “You are young, bhikkhu, to have left the world, black-haired, with the bloom of youth. In your youthful prime you do not enjoy the pleasures of the senses. Get your fill, bhikkhu, of human pleasures. Don’t reject the present moment to pursue what time will bring.” Samiddhi answers: “I . . . do not reject the present moment to pursue what time will bring. I reject what time will bring to pursue the present moment.”1 Likewise, the Arañña Sutta,

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 28, 2017

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