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A Soup for the Qan: Chinese Dietary Medicine of the Mongol Era as Seen in Hu Szu-Hui's Yin-shan Cheng-Yao (review)

A Soup for the Qan: Chinese Dietary Medicine of the Mongol Era as Seen in Hu Szu-Hui's Yin-shan... Book Reviews In contrast to the nineteenth century, neoliberalism has wrought considerable changes in popular consumption and identities, gross inequalities notwithstanding. I'm still perplexed by these periodizations. Is it something in the goods themselves that harbors say "modernizing" qualities, or do broad historical-cultural-political processes (such as Spanish colonialism) lend meaning to any basket of goods? Could an American hamburger become, perhaps, a civilizing good under differing circumstances? I was also left wondering about the common existence of a Latin American consumption culture, from Mexico to Argentina, given the insularity of regional patria chicas until the twentieth century. Was it the industrial and global age, with its mass media and production, that finally brought Latin Americans together around a big table, or is there a deeper unity in Iberian-American ways? The big questions are left mainly to the reader's discretion here. World historians may likely buy this book to get at Latin America's relative degree of lifestyle "Westernization," as the world's senior colonial outpost and the first to achieve any political freedom. Each reader of this fascinating book will be obsessed by some details (as Bauer himself obviously is with Chilean viticulture); I was puzzled by a too-brief history http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

A Soup for the Qan: Chinese Dietary Medicine of the Mongol Era as Seen in Hu Szu-Hui's Yin-shan Cheng-Yao (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 14 (4) – Oct 12, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews In contrast to the nineteenth century, neoliberalism has wrought considerable changes in popular consumption and identities, gross inequalities notwithstanding. I'm still perplexed by these periodizations. Is it something in the goods themselves that harbors say "modernizing" qualities, or do broad historical-cultural-political processes (such as Spanish colonialism) lend meaning to any basket of goods? Could an American hamburger become, perhaps, a civilizing good under differing circumstances? I was also left wondering about the common existence of a Latin American consumption culture, from Mexico to Argentina, given the insularity of regional patria chicas until the twentieth century. Was it the industrial and global age, with its mass media and production, that finally brought Latin Americans together around a big table, or is there a deeper unity in Iberian-American ways? The big questions are left mainly to the reader's discretion here. World historians may likely buy this book to get at Latin America's relative degree of lifestyle "Westernization," as the world's senior colonial outpost and the first to achieve any political freedom. Each reader of this fascinating book will be obsessed by some details (as Bauer himself obviously is with Chilean viticulture); I was puzzled by a too-brief history

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 12, 2003

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