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A Phonological Oddity in the Austronesian Area: Ejectives in Waimoa

A Phonological Oddity in the Austronesian Area: Ejectives in Waimoa Squib A Phonological Oddity in the Austronesian Area: Ejectives in Waimoa1 John Hajek university of melbourne John Bowden australian national university Details are provided about a series of ejective stops in Waimoa, spoken in East Timor. Not uncommon in other parts of the world, ejective stops are exceptionally rare within the whole Austronesian area. We report here on the existence of voiceless ejective stops in Waimoa (also Waima'a), an Austronesian language spoken in East Timor. This is only the second Austronesian language for which ejectives have ever been reported. According to the most recent edition of Ethnologue (Grimes 2000), Waimoa is a member of the Nuclear Timor subgrouping within the larger Timor grouping inside Central Malayo-Polynesian. 2 The language is most closely related to Kairui-Midiki and Habu, and has approximately 3,000 speakers living in a small number of villages on the Baucau plateau on the northeastern coast of East Timor. Neighboring languages are Galoli (Austronesian) to the west, Kairui-Midiki to the south, and Makasae (non-Austronesian) concentrated in and around the city of Baucau immediately to the east. Tetun Dili is widely used as a lingua franca in interethnic communication in this whole area--particularly with the Makasae. Waimoa speakers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

A Phonological Oddity in the Austronesian Area: Ejectives in Waimoa

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 41 (1) – Jun 1, 2002

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9421
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Abstract

Squib A Phonological Oddity in the Austronesian Area: Ejectives in Waimoa1 John Hajek university of melbourne John Bowden australian national university Details are provided about a series of ejective stops in Waimoa, spoken in East Timor. Not uncommon in other parts of the world, ejective stops are exceptionally rare within the whole Austronesian area. We report here on the existence of voiceless ejective stops in Waimoa (also Waima'a), an Austronesian language spoken in East Timor. This is only the second Austronesian language for which ejectives have ever been reported. According to the most recent edition of Ethnologue (Grimes 2000), Waimoa is a member of the Nuclear Timor subgrouping within the larger Timor grouping inside Central Malayo-Polynesian. 2 The language is most closely related to Kairui-Midiki and Habu, and has approximately 3,000 speakers living in a small number of villages on the Baucau plateau on the northeastern coast of East Timor. Neighboring languages are Galoli (Austronesian) to the west, Kairui-Midiki to the south, and Makasae (non-Austronesian) concentrated in and around the city of Baucau immediately to the east. Tetun Dili is widely used as a lingua franca in interethnic communication in this whole area--particularly with the Makasae. Waimoa speakers

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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