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A New View of the Huainanzi

A New View of the Huainanzi 436 John S. Major, Sarah A. Queen, Andrew S. Meyer, and Harold D. Roth, translators. The Huainanzi: A Guide to the Theory and Practice of Government in Early Han China. Translations from the Asian Classics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. xi, 988 pp. Hardcover $75.00. isbn 978-0-231-14204-5. In 139 b.c.e., Liu An , king of Huainan, presented The Book of the Master of Huainan to his nephew, who had recently become the Martial Emperor (Wudi ). Until recently, few historians of philosophy found his writings worth thinking about. Fung Yu-lan's massive survey gives the book a mere five pages; it was "a miscellaneous compilation of all schools of thought, and lacks unity." Wing-tsit Chan's sourcebook accords only three pages to brief extracts from four chapters, because Liu An's "ideas are no more than reiteration and elaboration of Laozi and Zhuangzi." Benjamin Schwartz's The World of Thought in Ancient China cites the Huainanzi a couple of times but does not give it so much as a paragraph of discussion. A. C. Graham dispenses with the whole period by declaring that rationality "develops with the controversies of the schools, and dwindles as they fade after 200 b.c."1 Scholars now http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

A New View of the Huainanzi

China Review International , Volume 18 (4) – Jan 30, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

436 John S. Major, Sarah A. Queen, Andrew S. Meyer, and Harold D. Roth, translators. The Huainanzi: A Guide to the Theory and Practice of Government in Early Han China. Translations from the Asian Classics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. xi, 988 pp. Hardcover $75.00. isbn 978-0-231-14204-5. In 139 b.c.e., Liu An , king of Huainan, presented The Book of the Master of Huainan to his nephew, who had recently become the Martial Emperor (Wudi ). Until recently, few historians of philosophy found his writings worth thinking about. Fung Yu-lan's massive survey gives the book a mere five pages; it was "a miscellaneous compilation of all schools of thought, and lacks unity." Wing-tsit Chan's sourcebook accords only three pages to brief extracts from four chapters, because Liu An's "ideas are no more than reiteration and elaboration of Laozi and Zhuangzi." Benjamin Schwartz's The World of Thought in Ancient China cites the Huainanzi a couple of times but does not give it so much as a paragraph of discussion. A. C. Graham dispenses with the whole period by declaring that rationality "develops with the controversies of the schools, and dwindles as they fade after 200 b.c."1 Scholars now

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 30, 2011

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