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A Nation, a World, in a Bowl of Tea

A Nation, a World, in a Bowl of Tea r e v i e W e s sa Y s d ana b u ntro CK University of California, Berkeley Fujimori Terunobu. 藤森照信 Fujimori Terunobu no Chashitsugaku: Nihon no Kyokushō Kūkan no Nazo [Fujimori Terunobu’s tearoom studies: The riddle of Japan’s smallest space]. 藤森照信の茶室学。日本の極小空間の謎. Tokyo: Rikuyosha, 2012. 296 pp. ¥3,000 (cloth). Surak, Kristin. Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012. 272 pp. $85 (cloth), $25 (paper/ebook). A kimono. A tatami floor. A bowl. Together, these objects almost instantly evoke the Japanese tea c - er emony, though they are seen throughout society: kimonos are worn for parties or weddings, tatami floors are as often as not found in inexpensive lodgings, and bowls of rice are served with almost every meal. Early on in her careful study Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice, Kristin Surak says, “The Japaneseness encoded in tea places, captured in tea objects, and patterned into tea movements can be interpreted and experienced as quintessentially Japanese by the Japanese themselves because it is different— but not completely removed— from mundane aspects of life” (18). Surak’s greatest strength is her awareness of the factors that inform the tea ceremony’s central http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
ISSN
2158-9666
eISSN
2158-9674

Abstract

r e v i e W e s sa Y s d ana b u ntro CK University of California, Berkeley Fujimori Terunobu. 藤森照信 Fujimori Terunobu no Chashitsugaku: Nihon no Kyokushō Kūkan no Nazo [Fujimori Terunobu’s tearoom studies: The riddle of Japan’s smallest space]. 藤森照信の茶室学。日本の極小空間の謎. Tokyo: Rikuyosha, 2012. 296 pp. ¥3,000 (cloth). Surak, Kristin. Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012. 272 pp. $85 (cloth), $25 (paper/ebook). A kimono. A tatami floor. A bowl. Together, these objects almost instantly evoke the Japanese tea c - er emony, though they are seen throughout society: kimonos are worn for parties or weddings, tatami floors are as often as not found in inexpensive lodgings, and bowls of rice are served with almost every meal. Early on in her careful study Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice, Kristin Surak says, “The Japaneseness encoded in tea places, captured in tea objects, and patterned into tea movements can be interpreted and experienced as quintessentially Japanese by the Japanese themselves because it is different— but not completely removed— from mundane aspects of life” (18). Surak’s greatest strength is her awareness of the factors that inform the tea ceremony’s central

Journal

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture ReviewUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 31, 2014

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