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A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (review)

A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (review) Book Reviews mation and interpretations of Luso-Dutch relations in the early years of European maritime expansion; their extensive use of Dutch and Portuguese archives should encourage future scholars to make use of these sources. robert van niel University of Hawai`i at Mänoa, Emeritus A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire. By sugata bose. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006. 333 pp. $27.95 (cloth). Revealing early on that his title is paraphrased from none other than Fernand Braudel, Sugata Bose alerts his readers that he intends his book to be an epic journey of "human agency, imagination, and action" (p. 4) carried on the warm waves of the Indian Ocean. This body of water's scholarship suffers neglect in comparison to the rich literatures of the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Pacific. This was clear from the unfortunate omission of the Indian Ocean from The American Historical Review's otherwise stimulating June 2006 forum on "Oceans of History." Who better than Bose, then--with a title of Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs at Harvard University--to captain Indian Ocean studies back into the conversation with theorists of oceanic world history and globalization? While he does sail into this discussion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 18 (3) – Nov 7, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews mation and interpretations of Luso-Dutch relations in the early years of European maritime expansion; their extensive use of Dutch and Portuguese archives should encourage future scholars to make use of these sources. robert van niel University of Hawai`i at Mänoa, Emeritus A Hundred Horizons: The Indian Ocean in the Age of Global Empire. By sugata bose. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006. 333 pp. $27.95 (cloth). Revealing early on that his title is paraphrased from none other than Fernand Braudel, Sugata Bose alerts his readers that he intends his book to be an epic journey of "human agency, imagination, and action" (p. 4) carried on the warm waves of the Indian Ocean. This body of water's scholarship suffers neglect in comparison to the rich literatures of the Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Pacific. This was clear from the unfortunate omission of the Indian Ocean from The American Historical Review's otherwise stimulating June 2006 forum on "Oceans of History." Who better than Bose, then--with a title of Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs at Harvard University--to captain Indian Ocean studies back into the conversation with theorists of oceanic world history and globalization? While he does sail into this discussion

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 7, 2007

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