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A History of Celibacy (review)

A History of Celibacy (review) journal of world history, june 2003 imperial China, the place of castration and religious ascetism in early Christianity, eunuchism in the Muslim world, including India, and emasculation in modern Western Europe. Scholz spends little time discussing India; eunuchism in China occupies a great deal more of his attention. Courtly eunuchism was seen as integral to the success and power of the Chinese empire, though it was not always practiced without severe controversy--thousands were slaughtered during the Han dynasty in an effort to weaken their political power only to rise again to 70,000 during the Ming. Lastly, Scholz provides an intriguing view of the special talents of the European vocal castrati who exalted sacred music and who played a critical role in the birth of opera. Mozart, for instance, used their crystalline voices--some could sing over a range of several octaves--until he tired of their demands. In a postscript, Scholz informs us that today eunuchism can be found in several forms around the world--the hijra wedding singers of India, the Heaven's Gate religious sect in the United States, transgender communities utilizing the Internet. In total, this work represents a very good beginning to understanding the varied and long, but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

A History of Celibacy (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 14 (2) – May 27, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

journal of world history, june 2003 imperial China, the place of castration and religious ascetism in early Christianity, eunuchism in the Muslim world, including India, and emasculation in modern Western Europe. Scholz spends little time discussing India; eunuchism in China occupies a great deal more of his attention. Courtly eunuchism was seen as integral to the success and power of the Chinese empire, though it was not always practiced without severe controversy--thousands were slaughtered during the Han dynasty in an effort to weaken their political power only to rise again to 70,000 during the Ming. Lastly, Scholz provides an intriguing view of the special talents of the European vocal castrati who exalted sacred music and who played a critical role in the birth of opera. Mozart, for instance, used their crystalline voices--some could sing over a range of several octaves--until he tired of their demands. In a postscript, Scholz informs us that today eunuchism can be found in several forms around the world--the hijra wedding singers of India, the Heaven's Gate religious sect in the United States, transgender communities utilizing the Internet. In total, this work represents a very good beginning to understanding the varied and long, but

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 27, 2003

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