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A Dragon’s Head and a Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598 by Kenneth M. Swope (review)

A Dragon’s Head and a Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War,... 122 China Review International: Vol. 19, No. 1, 2012 Finally, some aspects of the inter-Korea relationship perhaps could use more acknowledgment and development. For example, Snyder repeatedly notes the North Korean reluctance to adopt Chinese-style economic reforms (even aer ft Kim Jong-il’s famous 2006 southern tour of China’s most prosperous region). While it is likely that this reluctance stems, at least in part, from the fear of the potentially destabilizing impact of economic liberalization (P’yŏngyang paid close attention to what happened in both Beijing and Bucharest in 1989), it is also worth considering whether North Korea recognizes the influence of South Korea as inspiration and model for China’s economic reforms (as Snyder notes), making its resistance all the more steadfast and understandable. In addition, Snyder appears to assume that all South Koreans have consistently longed for unification (he is fairly silent on the opinion of North Koreans on this matter). However, one moti- vation for the sunshine policy of engagement with North Korea implemented by Kim Dae Jung and Roh Moo Hyun is arguably the desire to defer unification to a distant future (if at all). Hence, while some diplomats in the Kim Young Sam administration may have chafed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

A Dragon’s Head and a Serpent’s Tail: Ming China and the First Great East Asian War, 1592–1598 by Kenneth M. Swope (review)

China Review International , Volume 19 (1) – Feb 19, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

122 China Review International: Vol. 19, No. 1, 2012 Finally, some aspects of the inter-Korea relationship perhaps could use more acknowledgment and development. For example, Snyder repeatedly notes the North Korean reluctance to adopt Chinese-style economic reforms (even aer ft Kim Jong-il’s famous 2006 southern tour of China’s most prosperous region). While it is likely that this reluctance stems, at least in part, from the fear of the potentially destabilizing impact of economic liberalization (P’yŏngyang paid close attention to what happened in both Beijing and Bucharest in 1989), it is also worth considering whether North Korea recognizes the influence of South Korea as inspiration and model for China’s economic reforms (as Snyder notes), making its resistance all the more steadfast and understandable. In addition, Snyder appears to assume that all South Koreans have consistently longed for unification (he is fairly silent on the opinion of North Koreans on this matter). However, one moti- vation for the sunshine policy of engagement with North Korea implemented by Kim Dae Jung and Roh Moo Hyun is arguably the desire to defer unification to a distant future (if at all). Hence, while some diplomats in the Kim Young Sam administration may have chafed

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 19, 2014

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