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A Christian Commentary on the Dhammapada

A Christian Commentary on the Dhammapada Leo D. Lefebure Georgetown University When the great composer Charles Ives was growing up in Danbury, Connecticut, in the late nineteenth century, he heard his father's marching band on one side of the town square, as well as another marching band playing separately on the other side, but close enough to be within earshot of his father's band. The sounds of the two bands clashed with each other within the hearing of young Charles, violating all the usual rules of musical composition but creating a new, intriguing experience as he held them both in his hearing at the same time. Years later the memory of such experiences flowed into the mature music of his Fourth Symphony and other works. Some years ago I was chatting with Paul Knitter at a reception at a Catholic Theological Society of America convention when Catherine Cornille approached us with her usual energy and enthusiasm and asked us whether we would each like to contribute to her projected series of Christian commentaries on sacred non-Christian texts. In some ways the challenge of this project resembles that of the young Charles Ives--if we are already listening to one marching band, how do we hear http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

A Christian Commentary on the Dhammapada

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 33 (1)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

Leo D. Lefebure Georgetown University When the great composer Charles Ives was growing up in Danbury, Connecticut, in the late nineteenth century, he heard his father's marching band on one side of the town square, as well as another marching band playing separately on the other side, but close enough to be within earshot of his father's band. The sounds of the two bands clashed with each other within the hearing of young Charles, violating all the usual rules of musical composition but creating a new, intriguing experience as he held them both in his hearing at the same time. Years later the memory of such experiences flowed into the mature music of his Fourth Symphony and other works. Some years ago I was chatting with Paul Knitter at a reception at a Catholic Theological Society of America convention when Catherine Cornille approached us with her usual energy and enthusiasm and asked us whether we would each like to contribute to her projected series of Christian commentaries on sacred non-Christian texts. In some ways the challenge of this project resembles that of the young Charles Ives--if we are already listening to one marching band, how do we hear

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

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