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A Bird that Flies with Two Wings: Kastom and State Justice Systems in Vanuatu (review)

A Bird that Flies with Two Wings: Kastom and State Justice Systems in Vanuatu (review) the contemporary pacific 23:2 (2011) chilega's book is no easy read. The reader's undivided attention is required to follow her densely argued comparative analyses as they perform the meticulous work of counter-hegemony that Antonio Gramsci called the "war of position" and likened to trench warfare (Selections from the Prison Notebooks, 1971). Legendary Hawai`i and the Politics of Place should become essential reading for those interested in unworking the legacies of colonial literature and visual culture. In her final chapter, Bacchilega describes classroom activities in which students discuss their responses to reading "multicultural" ghost stories set in Hawai`i. In these pedagogical moments, we glimpse how the author has created opportunities for students to analyze popular appropriations of Hawaiian cultural knowledge and question their circulation through colonial translations. tional readings. Such is the case with Hawaii, Its People, Their Legends (1904), by Hawaiian scholar Emma Kaili Metcalf Beckley Nakuina. Interestingly enough, Nakuina's text was published by the Hawaii Promotions with a large number of photographic illustrations. Even though it visually resembled publications by Thrum and Westervelt, its constellation of paratextual elements created a different interpretative framework. In contrast to most legendary Hawai`i stories, it included far fewer images of coconut http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

A Bird that Flies with Two Wings: Kastom and State Justice Systems in Vanuatu (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 23 (2) – Aug 20, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9464
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific 23:2 (2011) chilega's book is no easy read. The reader's undivided attention is required to follow her densely argued comparative analyses as they perform the meticulous work of counter-hegemony that Antonio Gramsci called the "war of position" and likened to trench warfare (Selections from the Prison Notebooks, 1971). Legendary Hawai`i and the Politics of Place should become essential reading for those interested in unworking the legacies of colonial literature and visual culture. In her final chapter, Bacchilega describes classroom activities in which students discuss their responses to reading "multicultural" ghost stories set in Hawai`i. In these pedagogical moments, we glimpse how the author has created opportunities for students to analyze popular appropriations of Hawaiian cultural knowledge and question their circulation through colonial translations. tional readings. Such is the case with Hawaii, Its People, Their Legends (1904), by Hawaiian scholar Emma Kaili Metcalf Beckley Nakuina. Interestingly enough, Nakuina's text was published by the Hawaii Promotions with a large number of photographic illustrations. Even though it visually resembled publications by Thrum and Westervelt, its constellation of paratextual elements created a different interpretative framework. In contrast to most legendary Hawai`i stories, it included far fewer images of coconut

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 20, 2011

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