Stolen Fruit Tastes Better

Stolen Fruit Tastes Better critical reflection | julia hebaiter nb: this tale is purely hypothetical. Neither the author nor condones any illegal practices, while both stress the importance of respecting the law and people's private property. Fruit strategically snaffled from trees is decidedly more delicious than that acquired by more conventional means. Summer, in particular, brings ample booty to the 'burbs. Of course, I don't actually recommend stealing it; that would be downright theft. I'm thinking more along the lines of taking the ancient practice of gleaning, or collecting the remaining grain after the reapers, to another level by purposefully creating every available opportunity to find, claim, and wrap one's lips around the sweet, fresh flesh that overhangs private fences onto public land. For instance, while picking the odd piece of fruit you encounter while walking the local neighborhood is all well and good, as are community gleaning initiatives, a dedicated hunt in the car can also prove quite lucrative. Parks, alleyways, and train-station car parks can proffer plenty of bounty, while the long, seductive backyard fences lining train tracks have great picking potential too. Railways, however, are sometimes difficult to access and often downright dangerous. While I'd go to extraordinary lengths http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture University of California Press

Stolen Fruit Tastes Better

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
© 2014 by The Regents of the University of California
Subject
Critical Reflections
ISSN
1529-3262
eISSN
1533-8622
D.O.I.
10.1525/gfc.2014.14.1.59
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

critical reflection | julia hebaiter nb: this tale is purely hypothetical. Neither the author nor condones any illegal practices, while both stress the importance of respecting the law and people's private property. Fruit strategically snaffled from trees is decidedly more delicious than that acquired by more conventional means. Summer, in particular, brings ample booty to the 'burbs. Of course, I don't actually recommend stealing it; that would be downright theft. I'm thinking more along the lines of taking the ancient practice of gleaning, or collecting the remaining grain after the reapers, to another level by purposefully creating every available opportunity to find, claim, and wrap one's lips around the sweet, fresh flesh that overhangs private fences onto public land. For instance, while picking the odd piece of fruit you encounter while walking the local neighborhood is all well and good, as are community gleaning initiatives, a dedicated hunt in the car can also prove quite lucrative. Parks, alleyways, and train-station car parks can proffer plenty of bounty, while the long, seductive backyard fences lining train tracks have great picking potential too. Railways, however, are sometimes difficult to access and often downright dangerous. While I'd go to extraordinary lengths

Journal

Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and CultureUniversity of California Press

Published: Apr 1, 2014

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