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"Quest for Middle East Peace: How and Why It Failed"

"Quest for Middle East Peace: How and Why It Failed" TH E PA L E S T IN IA N -IS R A E L I CA M P DA V ID NE G O T IA T IO N S AND BE Y O N D international resolutions rather than within the confines of America’s uncertain proposals. In January, a final effort betw een Israeli and Palestinian negotiators in the Egyptian town of Taba (without the Americans) produced more progress and some hope. But it was, by then, at least to some of the negotiators, too late. On 20 January, Clinton had packed his bags and was on his way out. In Israel, meanw hile, Sharon was on his way in. Had there been, in hindsight, a generous Israeli offer? Ask a member of the American team, and an honest answer might be that there was a moving target of ideas, fluctuating impressions of the deal the U.S. could sell to the two sides, a work in progress that reacted (and therefore was vulnerable) to the pressures and persuasion of both. Ask Barak, and he might volunteer that there was no Israeli offer and, besides, Arafat rejected it. Ask Arafat, and the response you might hear is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Palestine Studies University of California Press

"Quest for Middle East Peace: How and Why It Failed"

Journal of Palestine Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Copyright © by the University of California Press
Subject
Research Article
ISSN
0377-919X
eISSN
1533-8614
DOI
10.1525/jps.2001.31.1.75
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

TH E PA L E S T IN IA N -IS R A E L I CA M P DA V ID NE G O T IA T IO N S AND BE Y O N D international resolutions rather than within the confines of America’s uncertain proposals. In January, a final effort betw een Israeli and Palestinian negotiators in the Egyptian town of Taba (without the Americans) produced more progress and some hope. But it was, by then, at least to some of the negotiators, too late. On 20 January, Clinton had packed his bags and was on his way out. In Israel, meanw hile, Sharon was on his way in. Had there been, in hindsight, a generous Israeli offer? Ask a member of the American team, and an honest answer might be that there was a moving target of ideas, fluctuating impressions of the deal the U.S. could sell to the two sides, a work in progress that reacted (and therefore was vulnerable) to the pressures and persuasion of both. Ask Barak, and he might volunteer that there was no Israeli offer and, besides, Arafat rejected it. Ask Arafat, and the response you might hear is

Journal

Journal of Palestine StudiesUniversity of California Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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