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Falafel: A National Icon

Falafel: A National Icon i d e n t i t i e s | yael raviv Falafel: A National Icon Falafel in pita bread, dripping with tahini sauce, vegetables, and pickles—here is a messy, economically overflowing image of the Israeli nation. had become a popular snack with the younger generation, and by the 1950s it was common throughout Israeli society. Ultimately, falafel became one of the icons of Israeli culture. In her study of the bagel in the United States, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett has outlined a series of stages the bagel passed through on its way to becoming the popular American food it is today.4 The same stages are useful to illuminate the transformation of falafel’s status in Israeli society. In the first stage, which Kirshenblatt-Gimblett terms “self-evident,” the product is taken for granted. The position of falafel in the everyday Arab diet was certainly “self-evident.” The second stage, termed “self-conscious,” is an accurate description of how early Jewish immigrants adopted certain local Arab cultural practices in a deliberate attempt to relinquish Diaspora habits in favor of a new existence in Palestine. The halutzim of the Second and Third Aliya (Jewish immigration to Israel) chose to adopt certain Arab models that they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gastronomica University of California Press

Falafel: A National Icon

Gastronomica , Volume 3 (3) – Aug 1, 2003

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Publisher
University of California Press
Copyright
Regents of the University of California
ISSN
1529-3262
eISSN
1533-8622
DOI
10.1525/gfc.2003.3.3.20
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

i d e n t i t i e s | yael raviv Falafel: A National Icon Falafel in pita bread, dripping with tahini sauce, vegetables, and pickles—here is a messy, economically overflowing image of the Israeli nation. had become a popular snack with the younger generation, and by the 1950s it was common throughout Israeli society. Ultimately, falafel became one of the icons of Israeli culture. In her study of the bagel in the United States, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett has outlined a series of stages the bagel passed through on its way to becoming the popular American food it is today.4 The same stages are useful to illuminate the transformation of falafel’s status in Israeli society. In the first stage, which Kirshenblatt-Gimblett terms “self-evident,” the product is taken for granted. The position of falafel in the everyday Arab diet was certainly “self-evident.” The second stage, termed “self-conscious,” is an accurate description of how early Jewish immigrants adopted certain local Arab cultural practices in a deliberate attempt to relinquish Diaspora habits in favor of a new existence in Palestine. The halutzim of the Second and Third Aliya (Jewish immigration to Israel) chose to adopt certain Arab models that they

Journal

GastronomicaUniversity of California Press

Published: Aug 1, 2003

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