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Virtual Roundtable on Mapping Gendered Violence

Virtual Roundtable on Mapping Gendered Violence Virtual Roundtable on Mapping Gendered Violence Raminder Kaur, Maggie O’Neill, Nicola Henry, and Krista Benson Edited by Anastasia Christou and Cindy Cruz Raminder Kaur Can We Know No? Refl ections on Domestic Violence in the Transit Lounge of Mishti Gals What is it about relationships in which love and care continue to act as emo- tional adhesive despite the eruption of violence? What other positions ex- ist apart from the more familiar victim- perpetrator, abused- abuser binaries, which more oft en than not uniformly contract the reality of many situations involving domestic aggression? What does it mean when an abusive relation- ship reveals a person who is far from subordinated by it but may indeed in- fl ect it with his or her own personal stamp? It is precisely such questions that infl uenced me in my writing of a drama in 2016 on the relationships of Asian women based in East London in “Brexit Britain” that I elaborate in what fol- lows. Fictionalizing the issues allowed me not only to refl ect on social real- ities that extend well beyond Asian communities but also to appreciate the complexities of individual characters without compromising anyone’s real- life identity on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies uni_neb

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Frontiers Editorial Collective.
ISSN
1536-0334

Abstract

Virtual Roundtable on Mapping Gendered Violence Raminder Kaur, Maggie O’Neill, Nicola Henry, and Krista Benson Edited by Anastasia Christou and Cindy Cruz Raminder Kaur Can We Know No? Refl ections on Domestic Violence in the Transit Lounge of Mishti Gals What is it about relationships in which love and care continue to act as emo- tional adhesive despite the eruption of violence? What other positions ex- ist apart from the more familiar victim- perpetrator, abused- abuser binaries, which more oft en than not uniformly contract the reality of many situations involving domestic aggression? What does it mean when an abusive relation- ship reveals a person who is far from subordinated by it but may indeed in- fl ect it with his or her own personal stamp? It is precisely such questions that infl uenced me in my writing of a drama in 2016 on the relationships of Asian women based in East London in “Brexit Britain” that I elaborate in what fol- lows. Fictionalizing the issues allowed me not only to refl ect on social real- ities that extend well beyond Asian communities but also to appreciate the complexities of individual characters without compromising anyone’s real- life identity on

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studiesuni_neb

Published: Jun 30, 2018

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