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The Women in German Yearbook Then and Now: Reflections on History and Hopes for the Future

The Women in German Yearbook Then and Now: Reflections on History and Hopes for the Future It was an honor to receive the editors' invitation to contribute a piece to the twenty-fifth Women in German Yearbook. I spontaneously said yes, but when the time came to put fingers to keyboard, it wasn't clear what was left for me to say. I've written about the Yearbook before. In the late 1990s, Helen Cafferty and I co-authored a reflective piece about our efforts to achieve feminist collaboration and provide supportive criticism during our term as co-editors of the Yearbook (Cafferty and Clausen). In 2004, Jeannine Blackwell and I wrote about the Yearbook's origins and speculated about its future, specifically recommending that WiG move toward an online journal that would take full advantage of the digital environment (Blackwell and Clausen). Following Jeannine's and my advice to explore this idea, I conducted a survey of WiG members during my term as WiG President (2004­06) and tried to initiate discussion of an online journal with the WiG Steering Committee and other officers. The discussion went nowhere. Briefly, it boiled down to this: just about everyone preferred to consult online publications when conducting research but no one wanted to publish in an online journal. It occurred to me that there http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Culture uni_neb

The Women in German Yearbook Then and Now: Reflections on History and Hopes for the Future

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1940-512X
Publisher site
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Abstract

It was an honor to receive the editors' invitation to contribute a piece to the twenty-fifth Women in German Yearbook. I spontaneously said yes, but when the time came to put fingers to keyboard, it wasn't clear what was left for me to say. I've written about the Yearbook before. In the late 1990s, Helen Cafferty and I co-authored a reflective piece about our efforts to achieve feminist collaboration and provide supportive criticism during our term as co-editors of the Yearbook (Cafferty and Clausen). In 2004, Jeannine Blackwell and I wrote about the Yearbook's origins and speculated about its future, specifically recommending that WiG move toward an online journal that would take full advantage of the digital environment (Blackwell and Clausen). Following Jeannine's and my advice to explore this idea, I conducted a survey of WiG members during my term as WiG President (2004­06) and tried to initiate discussion of an online journal with the WiG Steering Committee and other officers. The discussion went nowhere. Briefly, it boiled down to this: just about everyone preferred to consult online publications when conducting research but no one wanted to publish in an online journal. It occurred to me that there

Journal

Women in German Yearbook: Feminist Studies in German Literature & Cultureuni_neb

Published: Nov 7, 2009

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