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The University as the “Imagined Other”: Making Sense of Community Co-Produced Literacy Research

The University as the “Imagined Other”: Making Sense of Community Co-Produced Literacy Research The University as the “Imagined Other” Making Sense of Community Co- Produced Literacy Research KATE PAHL, University of Sheffield Th e motivation for working together is really less to do with bringing diff erent skills to bear on a common problem but rather, it is this immediacy of response encountered in the discussion of ideas, combined with the consummate otherness of thought which the collaborative partner brings. Ian Rawlinson and Nick Crowe (2012) Writing With or Without the “Other”: What Is There to Know? Collaboration can begin with a conversation. Listening Voices, Telling Stories was a project that engaged women from ethnic minority back- grounds in reading poetry from a number of diff erent cultures; they met in a community library in Rotherham, a city located in South Yorkshire, in the United Kingdom. Zanib Rasool was one of the community re- searchers who developed this project. Zanib is from a British South Asian background and is passionate about the need for women to recover their heritage through poetry. She suggested that together we could read Urdu women poets from Pakistan who were oft en overlooked in school poet- ry teaching. As an activist in the community, she was also http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

The University as the “Imagined Other”: Making Sense of Community Co-Produced Literacy Research

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 8 – Mar 4, 2017

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009

Abstract

The University as the “Imagined Other” Making Sense of Community Co- Produced Literacy Research KATE PAHL, University of Sheffield Th e motivation for working together is really less to do with bringing diff erent skills to bear on a common problem but rather, it is this immediacy of response encountered in the discussion of ideas, combined with the consummate otherness of thought which the collaborative partner brings. Ian Rawlinson and Nick Crowe (2012) Writing With or Without the “Other”: What Is There to Know? Collaboration can begin with a conversation. Listening Voices, Telling Stories was a project that engaged women from ethnic minority back- grounds in reading poetry from a number of diff erent cultures; they met in a community library in Rotherham, a city located in South Yorkshire, in the United Kingdom. Zanib Rasool was one of the community re- searchers who developed this project. Zanib is from a British South Asian background and is passionate about the need for women to recover their heritage through poetry. She suggested that together we could read Urdu women poets from Pakistan who were oft en overlooked in school poet- ry teaching. As an activist in the community, she was also

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 4, 2017

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