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"Side by Side or Facing One Another": Writing and Collaborative Ethnography in Comparative Perspective

"Side by Side or Facing One Another": Writing and Collaborative Ethnography in Comparative... "side by side or Facing one another" Writing and Collaborative Ethnography in Comparative Perspective les w. field, University of New Mexico introduction In 2000, I began a collaborative project with Cheryl Seidner, the chair of the Table Bluff Wiyot Rancheria, and her sister, Leona Wilkinson, who heads the tribe's Culture Committee. Seidner, Wilkinson, and I agreed to collaboratively formulate the methods and goals of a project of mutual interest and to also work together to shape the final written form that resulted from our work. Their great-grandfather had survived the 1860 Indian Island Massacre, where more than sixty and likely as many as two hundred Wiyot men, women, and children were killed by six white men, "known to be landowners and businessmen" from the nearby city of Eureka, California (Kowinski 2004, D1). The Wiyot village of Tuluwat, located on what became known as Indian Island in Humboldt Bay, had been a site where Wiyot bands had conducted World Renewal ceremonies.1 The massacre was perpetrated while a large number of Wiyots had congregated at the village for these ritual dances. In the years following the massacre, the site was overtaken by a shipyard. By the middle of the twentieth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

"Side by Side or Facing One Another": Writing and Collaborative Ethnography in Comparative Perspective

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 26, 2008

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University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
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2152-4009
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Abstract

"side by side or Facing one another" Writing and Collaborative Ethnography in Comparative Perspective les w. field, University of New Mexico introduction In 2000, I began a collaborative project with Cheryl Seidner, the chair of the Table Bluff Wiyot Rancheria, and her sister, Leona Wilkinson, who heads the tribe's Culture Committee. Seidner, Wilkinson, and I agreed to collaboratively formulate the methods and goals of a project of mutual interest and to also work together to shape the final written form that resulted from our work. Their great-grandfather had survived the 1860 Indian Island Massacre, where more than sixty and likely as many as two hundred Wiyot men, women, and children were killed by six white men, "known to be landowners and businessmen" from the nearby city of Eureka, California (Kowinski 2004, D1). The Wiyot village of Tuluwat, located on what became known as Indian Island in Humboldt Bay, had been a site where Wiyot bands had conducted World Renewal ceremonies.1 The massacre was perpetrated while a large number of Wiyots had congregated at the village for these ritual dances. In the years following the massacre, the site was overtaken by a shipyard. By the middle of the twentieth

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 26, 2008

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