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Reflections on Collaboration, Ethnographic and Applied

Reflections on Collaboration, Ethnographic and Applied reFlection anD coMMentarY james l. peacock, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Ethnography for me began with collaboration as a necessity, but lately collaboration has become an end--part of relationships and "applied" work--with ethnography as a byproduct: a move from collaborative ethnography in a narrow sense to collaboration per se in a broader sense with possible ethnographic aspects. A reason for this shift is a move from research to applied work, with "applied" being a facet of a larger focus on social issues. I'll trace some ways this has unfolded. My first fieldwork was in Indonesia back in the early sixties. My wife and I lived with a family in a slum in Surabaya. We developed strong ties to each other so that collaboration was an end in itself, part of living together, but it was also a necessity, just to get by and get my work done. In 1983, one of the twelve children in that family moved to the community where we live. Sharing bonds to his mother and father, we became close friends; the ethnography part has almost disappeared or folded into our relationships, although it has reappeared in reverse; the grandson recently proposed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Reflections on Collaboration, Ethnographic and Applied

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 26, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009
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Abstract

reFlection anD coMMentarY james l. peacock, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Ethnography for me began with collaboration as a necessity, but lately collaboration has become an end--part of relationships and "applied" work--with ethnography as a byproduct: a move from collaborative ethnography in a narrow sense to collaboration per se in a broader sense with possible ethnographic aspects. A reason for this shift is a move from research to applied work, with "applied" being a facet of a larger focus on social issues. I'll trace some ways this has unfolded. My first fieldwork was in Indonesia back in the early sixties. My wife and I lived with a family in a slum in Surabaya. We developed strong ties to each other so that collaboration was an end in itself, part of living together, but it was also a necessity, just to get by and get my work done. In 1983, one of the twelve children in that family moved to the community where we live. Sharing bonds to his mother and father, we became close friends; the ethnography part has almost disappeared or folded into our relationships, although it has reappeared in reverse; the grandson recently proposed

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 26, 2008

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