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My Cry Gets Up to My Throat: Dysplacement, Indigenous Storywork, and Visual Sovereignty in the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation

My Cry Gets Up to My Throat: Dysplacement, Indigenous Storywork, and Visual Sovereignty in the... <p>Abstract:</p><p>The repatriation of sacred objects from the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History to the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation in North Dakota established the foundation for a long-term research partnership that resulted in an oral history project and documentary about the life and times of a missionary to the reservation in the past, and it provided a means for elders to historicize the present and communicate to the next generation their concerns about contemporary times. Through a collaborative filmmaking process that highlighted visual sovereignty and engaged in Indigenous storywork, the resulting video represented the past in the community members’ own terms, sparked dialogue in community vetting sessions about the oil boom, and became a teaching resource for the tribal college.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies uni_neb

My Cry Gets Up to My Throat: Dysplacement, Indigenous Storywork, and Visual Sovereignty in the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 14 – Dec 18, 2021

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>The repatriation of sacred objects from the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History to the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation in North Dakota established the foundation for a long-term research partnership that resulted in an oral history project and documentary about the life and times of a missionary to the reservation in the past, and it provided a means for elders to historicize the present and communicate to the next generation their concerns about contemporary times. Through a collaborative filmmaking process that highlighted visual sovereignty and engaged in Indigenous storywork, the resulting video represented the past in the community members’ own terms, sparked dialogue in community vetting sessions about the oil boom, and became a teaching resource for the tribal college.</p>

Journal

Collaborative Anthropologiesuni_neb

Published: Dec 18, 2021

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