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Mixed-Race Women and Epistemologies of Belonging

Mixed-Race Women and Epistemologies of Belonging silvia cristina bettez How is it that people know when they belong and to what they belong? This question, about the epistemology of belonging, carries a particular complexity for mixed-race women. How is it that mixed-race women create a sense of identification with others? What are the unities and disjunctures? What can we understand about epistemologies of belonging through examining how mixed-race women create belonging? Through qualitative work based on the life stories of women of mixed heritage, in this paper I examine how the navigation of hybridity, as it is experienced in the lives of six "hybrid" mixedrace women, illuminates the complexities of identity construction and epistemologies of belonging.1 I use the term epistemology to signify the nature of knowledge, how we come to know things, in this case knowledge, or knowing, related to belonging. Belonging in human relations is connected to identity, both self-identification and identification with others. Stuart Hall argues that identities are constituted discursively. He states: I use "identity" to refer to the meeting point, the point of suture, between, on the one hand, the discourses and practices which attempt to "interpellate", speak to us or hail us into place as the social subjects http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies uni_neb

Mixed-Race Women and Epistemologies of Belonging

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1536-0334
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

silvia cristina bettez How is it that people know when they belong and to what they belong? This question, about the epistemology of belonging, carries a particular complexity for mixed-race women. How is it that mixed-race women create a sense of identification with others? What are the unities and disjunctures? What can we understand about epistemologies of belonging through examining how mixed-race women create belonging? Through qualitative work based on the life stories of women of mixed heritage, in this paper I examine how the navigation of hybridity, as it is experienced in the lives of six "hybrid" mixedrace women, illuminates the complexities of identity construction and epistemologies of belonging.1 I use the term epistemology to signify the nature of knowledge, how we come to know things, in this case knowledge, or knowing, related to belonging. Belonging in human relations is connected to identity, both self-identification and identification with others. Stuart Hall argues that identities are constituted discursively. He states: I use "identity" to refer to the meeting point, the point of suture, between, on the one hand, the discourses and practices which attempt to "interpellate", speak to us or hail us into place as the social subjects

Journal

Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studiesuni_neb

Published: Jun 16, 2010

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