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Learning to Listen: Community Collaboration in an Alaska Native Village

Learning to Listen: Community Collaboration in an Alaska Native Village Learning to Listen Community Collaboration in an Alaska Native Village HOLLY CUSACK- MCVEIGH, Indiana University– Purdue University Indianapolis Eight anthropology and museum studies graduate and undergraduate students from Indiana University– Purdue University Indianapolis (iu- pui), who were participating in a summer fi eld school, had traveled some four thousand miles to the Sugpiaq/Alutiiq coastal village of Nanwalek, Alaska, to participate in a three- week- long community- based collabora- tive project. We fl ew into the village on a Saturday evening in the summer of 2013. Nobody was there to greet us. Although I knew someone would soon arrive, my students were understandably anxious. One, refl ecting back on our arrival, wrote, “When we exited the plane and looked to the village we didn’t see too many people. No one was walking around or cu- rious to see us just yet. . . . I was worried we would be intruding on the locals; maybe they didn’t want us there.” My encouragement to go with the fl ow in an unfamiliar cultural setting could never match their experi- ence of uncertainty. Aft er a while and much to their relief, we were greet- ed at the airport by our hosts— only to learn http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Learning to Listen: Community Collaboration in an Alaska Native Village

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009

Abstract

Learning to Listen Community Collaboration in an Alaska Native Village HOLLY CUSACK- MCVEIGH, Indiana University– Purdue University Indianapolis Eight anthropology and museum studies graduate and undergraduate students from Indiana University– Purdue University Indianapolis (iu- pui), who were participating in a summer fi eld school, had traveled some four thousand miles to the Sugpiaq/Alutiiq coastal village of Nanwalek, Alaska, to participate in a three- week- long community- based collabora- tive project. We fl ew into the village on a Saturday evening in the summer of 2013. Nobody was there to greet us. Although I knew someone would soon arrive, my students were understandably anxious. One, refl ecting back on our arrival, wrote, “When we exited the plane and looked to the village we didn’t see too many people. No one was walking around or cu- rious to see us just yet. . . . I was worried we would be intruding on the locals; maybe they didn’t want us there.” My encouragement to go with the fl ow in an unfamiliar cultural setting could never match their experi- ence of uncertainty. Aft er a while and much to their relief, we were greet- ed at the airport by our hosts— only to learn

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 4, 2017

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