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Larry Zimmerman: A Collaborative Anthropologist at the Trowel’s Edge

Larry Zimmerman: A Collaborative Anthropologist at the Trowel’s Edge Larry Zimmerman A Collaborative Anthropologist at the Trowel’s Edge ALYSSA BOGE, Ah- Tah- Thi- Ki Museum At the end of this academic year Dr. Larry Zimmerman will retire from Indiana University- Purdue University Indianapolis (iupui ) aft er thir- teen years as professor of anthropology and Museum Studies and Public Scholar of Native American Representation, a position shared with the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art. His career has spanned more than forty years, has taken him to various states and coun- tries, and has aff ected many people (including this author). Although he never imagined the direction his career would take, his work has always revolved around collaborative anthropology. During a Skype interview I conducted recently with Dr. Zimmerman, I learned more about what he and his colleagues have referred to as “a random walk to public scholar- ship” (Holzman et al. 2014). Long before Zimmerman earned his PhD he was a kid growing up on a farm in Iowa, collecting arrowheads. As he explained, I had no idea what was going on except that they were pretty and they had to do with Indians . . . then we moved and I forgot about it all. I went http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Larry Zimmerman: A Collaborative Anthropologist at the Trowel’s Edge

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 8 – Mar 4, 2017

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009

Abstract

Larry Zimmerman A Collaborative Anthropologist at the Trowel’s Edge ALYSSA BOGE, Ah- Tah- Thi- Ki Museum At the end of this academic year Dr. Larry Zimmerman will retire from Indiana University- Purdue University Indianapolis (iupui ) aft er thir- teen years as professor of anthropology and Museum Studies and Public Scholar of Native American Representation, a position shared with the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art. His career has spanned more than forty years, has taken him to various states and coun- tries, and has aff ected many people (including this author). Although he never imagined the direction his career would take, his work has always revolved around collaborative anthropology. During a Skype interview I conducted recently with Dr. Zimmerman, I learned more about what he and his colleagues have referred to as “a random walk to public scholar- ship” (Holzman et al. 2014). Long before Zimmerman earned his PhD he was a kid growing up on a farm in Iowa, collecting arrowheads. As he explained, I had no idea what was going on except that they were pretty and they had to do with Indians . . . then we moved and I forgot about it all. I went

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 4, 2017

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