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Editors’ Introduction: Collaborations with Historical Societies, Libraries, and Museums: New Directions and Methods in Engaging Community and Institutional Partners

Editors’ Introduction: Collaborations with Historical Societies, Libraries, and Museums: New... Editors’ Introduction Collaborations with Historical Societies, Libraries, and Museums: New Directions and Methods in Engaging Community and Institutional Partners Over the past ten years collaboration has become a key value and practice of the discipline of anthropology that is now largely unquestioned. In all of anthropology’s subdisciplines, most anthropologists at least consider strategies for partnering with the communities and peoples with whom we work. As Paul Mullins (2011: 235) has written, “Th e question of wheth- er or not engaged scholarship has won over anthropology has apparently been settled, with every corner of the discipline concretely confronting the politics of anthropological thinking.” It is not, however, only a matter of accepting the assertion that col- laboration now lies at the heart of many of the research activities we undertake; the methodological and theoretical implications of such re- lationships and partnerships are, in and of themselves, worthy of our consideration and analysis and constitute a rich terrain for exploration. As the founding editor of this journal, Luke Eric Lassiter, noted in its inaugural issue, “Collaboration is no longer just a consequence of our multiple and diverse anthropologies; it now preconditions and shapes our anthropologies more pervasively than ever before” (Lassiter http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Editors’ Introduction: Collaborations with Historical Societies, Libraries, and Museums: New Directions and Methods in Engaging Community and Institutional Partners

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009

Abstract

Editors’ Introduction Collaborations with Historical Societies, Libraries, and Museums: New Directions and Methods in Engaging Community and Institutional Partners Over the past ten years collaboration has become a key value and practice of the discipline of anthropology that is now largely unquestioned. In all of anthropology’s subdisciplines, most anthropologists at least consider strategies for partnering with the communities and peoples with whom we work. As Paul Mullins (2011: 235) has written, “Th e question of wheth- er or not engaged scholarship has won over anthropology has apparently been settled, with every corner of the discipline concretely confronting the politics of anthropological thinking.” It is not, however, only a matter of accepting the assertion that col- laboration now lies at the heart of many of the research activities we undertake; the methodological and theoretical implications of such re- lationships and partnerships are, in and of themselves, worthy of our consideration and analysis and constitute a rich terrain for exploration. As the founding editor of this journal, Luke Eric Lassiter, noted in its inaugural issue, “Collaboration is no longer just a consequence of our multiple and diverse anthropologies; it now preconditions and shapes our anthropologies more pervasively than ever before” (Lassiter

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 4, 2017

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