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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction Collaborative Anthropologies rests on the premise that "collaboration," in its many different forms and articulations, offers ongoing opportunities for critically exploring the possibilities and challenges for the future of anthropological theory and practice. Collaboration--in very general terms, the wide range of theories and practices that relate to the dynamic and complex processes of navigating joint projects and partnerships--has always been a vital, albeit often implicit, facet of what we do as anthropologists. We all collaborate on some level in our wide range of anthropological practices. Today, however, collaboration has become more central to these practices. Collaboration is no longer just a consequence of our multiple and diverse anthropologies; it now preconditions and shapes our anthropologies more pervasively than ever before. Several scholars have noted that at the very time these collaborative anthropologies are becoming more common, the changing subjects, conditions, and work of our field are also expanding the range of collaborative possibilities--between and among researchers and their interlocutors, anthropologists and other scholar-practitioners, academics and other professionals, universities and local communities, faculty and students. These expanding collaborative possibilities are stimulating new theoretical and methodological approaches that promise to transform our anthropologies in new and exciting ways--especially as we http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Collaborative Anthropologies rests on the premise that "collaboration," in its many different forms and articulations, offers ongoing opportunities for critically exploring the possibilities and challenges for the future of anthropological theory and practice. Collaboration--in very general terms, the wide range of theories and practices that relate to the dynamic and complex processes of navigating joint projects and partnerships--has always been a vital, albeit often implicit, facet of what we do as anthropologists. We all collaborate on some level in our wide range of anthropological practices. Today, however, collaboration has become more central to these practices. Collaboration is no longer just a consequence of our multiple and diverse anthropologies; it now preconditions and shapes our anthropologies more pervasively than ever before. Several scholars have noted that at the very time these collaborative anthropologies are becoming more common, the changing subjects, conditions, and work of our field are also expanding the range of collaborative possibilities--between and among researchers and their interlocutors, anthropologists and other scholar-practitioners, academics and other professionals, universities and local communities, faculty and students. These expanding collaborative possibilities are stimulating new theoretical and methodological approaches that promise to transform our anthropologies in new and exciting ways--especially as we

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 26, 2008

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