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Editor’s Introduction

Editor’s Introduction Intractable and intransigent are two words that seem to describe the tone of provincial and federal government relations with Indigenous peoples in Canada these days. Th ere is much talk of collaboration, of forging new relations, of building futures together, and of reconciliation. Yet in Canada, police forcibly evicting Indigenous land defenders characterized the opening weeks of the new decade. Indigenous opposition to the continued expansion of fossil fuel industries manifests in new forms of political collaboration with settler communities. For two centuries Indigenous peoples in what is now called British Columbia have experienced repeated and consistent attempts to limit, displace, and remove them from their traditional territories. Anthropol- ogy shares a history of complicity wherein earlier ethnographers accepted as fact the disappearance of “real” Indians and busied themselves record- ing details of our cultures before they would disappear. Th ere have been attempts to move beyond settler colonial perspectives, but it oft en feels like too little too late. Th e most recent theater of confl ict repeats a long- standing narrative. Non- Indigenous businesses wish to access and use Indigenous lands. Some Indigenous leaders agree with development, while many others disagree. Among those who agree there are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies uni_neb

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009

Abstract

Intractable and intransigent are two words that seem to describe the tone of provincial and federal government relations with Indigenous peoples in Canada these days. Th ere is much talk of collaboration, of forging new relations, of building futures together, and of reconciliation. Yet in Canada, police forcibly evicting Indigenous land defenders characterized the opening weeks of the new decade. Indigenous opposition to the continued expansion of fossil fuel industries manifests in new forms of political collaboration with settler communities. For two centuries Indigenous peoples in what is now called British Columbia have experienced repeated and consistent attempts to limit, displace, and remove them from their traditional territories. Anthropol- ogy shares a history of complicity wherein earlier ethnographers accepted as fact the disappearance of “real” Indians and busied themselves record- ing details of our cultures before they would disappear. Th ere have been attempts to move beyond settler colonial perspectives, but it oft en feels like too little too late. Th e most recent theater of confl ict repeats a long- standing narrative. Non- Indigenous businesses wish to access and use Indigenous lands. Some Indigenous leaders agree with development, while many others disagree. Among those who agree there are

Journal

Collaborative Anthropologiesuni_neb

Published: Aug 13, 2020

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