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Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States (review)

Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States... book reviews Jordan E. Kerber, ed. Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2006. 379 pp. Paper, $24.95. jon daehnke, Stanford University The call for greater collaboration between archaeologists and Native American communities was first meaningfully sounded by Native American activists concerned about the mistreatment of ancestral remains by archaeologists and the lack of recognition of the sovereign right of tribes to control their own histories. Following this initial round of tribal activism, "collaborative" efforts were driven primarily by the necessity of compliance with cultural resource legislation that mandated consultation with descendant communities. In recent years, collaborative projects between archaeologists and Native Americans that are voluntary rather than compliance driven have appeared with increasing regularity. All three of these drivers of collaboration-- Native American activism and sovereignty concerns, cultural resource compliance, and voluntary partnerships--are apparent in Cross-Cultural Collaboration, a publication that provides a very useful and engaging discussion of Native American involvement in the practice of archaeology in the northeastern United States. Cross-Cultural Collaboration is a compilation of twenty case studies that highlight the nature and details of collaborative projects in eleven northeastern states as well as parts of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States (review)

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 26, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009
Publisher site
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Abstract

book reviews Jordan E. Kerber, ed. Cross-Cultural Collaboration: Native Peoples and Archaeology in the Northeastern United States. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2006. 379 pp. Paper, $24.95. jon daehnke, Stanford University The call for greater collaboration between archaeologists and Native American communities was first meaningfully sounded by Native American activists concerned about the mistreatment of ancestral remains by archaeologists and the lack of recognition of the sovereign right of tribes to control their own histories. Following this initial round of tribal activism, "collaborative" efforts were driven primarily by the necessity of compliance with cultural resource legislation that mandated consultation with descendant communities. In recent years, collaborative projects between archaeologists and Native Americans that are voluntary rather than compliance driven have appeared with increasing regularity. All three of these drivers of collaboration-- Native American activism and sovereignty concerns, cultural resource compliance, and voluntary partnerships--are apparent in Cross-Cultural Collaboration, a publication that provides a very useful and engaging discussion of Native American involvement in the practice of archaeology in the northeastern United States. Cross-Cultural Collaboration is a compilation of twenty case studies that highlight the nature and details of collaborative projects in eleven northeastern states as well as parts of

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 26, 2008

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