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Constance Fenimore Woolson: Portrait of a Lady Novelist by Anne Boyd Rioux (review)

Constance Fenimore Woolson: Portrait of a Lady Novelist by Anne Boyd Rioux (review) Studies in American Naturalism vol. 11, no. 2 narratival elements are less important than spectacular scenes in London’s documentary and short story, but that spectacle and narrative enter into a dialectical relationship in London’s and many other literary works of early filmic period, and that such a relationship had transformative effects on the experience of reading itself. In the Afterword, Clayton draws attention to examples of nostalgia for a pre-modern era of innocence, when, to borrow from cultural theorist Walter Benjamin, the work of art had not yet been emptied of its “aura” due to mechanical reproduction. For Clayton, such perspectives ignore what are remarkably “modernist” sensibilities of many authors of early photographic, pre-cinematic era. His many examples provide convincing evidence of nineteenth-century authors’ awareness of the various photographic technologies and their aesthetic potential as more than simple recording devices. Clayton’s study is a valuable contribution to researchers and teachers alike, providing new ways of understanding early photography as a series of different media, and offering a fresh approach to assessing the relationship between literature and photography. Paul Baggett is Associate Professor of English and Coordinator of Peace and Conflict Studies at South Dakota State University. He specializes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in American Naturalism University of Nebraska Press

Constance Fenimore Woolson: Portrait of a Lady Novelist by Anne Boyd Rioux (review)

Studies in American Naturalism , Volume 11 (2) – Aug 29, 2016

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
1944-6519
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Abstract

Studies in American Naturalism vol. 11, no. 2 narratival elements are less important than spectacular scenes in London’s documentary and short story, but that spectacle and narrative enter into a dialectical relationship in London’s and many other literary works of early filmic period, and that such a relationship had transformative effects on the experience of reading itself. In the Afterword, Clayton draws attention to examples of nostalgia for a pre-modern era of innocence, when, to borrow from cultural theorist Walter Benjamin, the work of art had not yet been emptied of its “aura” due to mechanical reproduction. For Clayton, such perspectives ignore what are remarkably “modernist” sensibilities of many authors of early photographic, pre-cinematic era. His many examples provide convincing evidence of nineteenth-century authors’ awareness of the various photographic technologies and their aesthetic potential as more than simple recording devices. Clayton’s study is a valuable contribution to researchers and teachers alike, providing new ways of understanding early photography as a series of different media, and offering a fresh approach to assessing the relationship between literature and photography. Paul Baggett is Associate Professor of English and Coordinator of Peace and Conflict Studies at South Dakota State University. He specializes

Journal

Studies in American NaturalismUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Aug 29, 2016

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