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Collaborative Anthropology as Classroom Teaching: The How and the Why

Collaborative Anthropology as Classroom Teaching: The How and the Why Collaborative Anthropology as Classroom Teaching e H Th ow and the Why HOLLY SWYERS, Lake Forest College In 2013 I wrote a piece for Anthropology News advocating for collaborative anthropology as part of classroom instruction. In that piece I described my ongoing collaboration with the Lake Forest– Lake Bluff Historical So- ciety to illustrate the use of externally generated fi eld experiences in the classroom. I have subsequently learned about other collaborative anthro- pologies involving students, ranging from Charles Menzies and Caroline Butler’s collaboration with the Gitxaała Nation (Menzies and Butler 2011) to Susan Hyatt’s contribution to “Anthropologists Back to School 2013” at the aaa annual meeting in Chicago (Hyatt 2014). I have also discovered Tim Wallace’s (2011: 255) critique of the eff ort to combine collaboration or service learning with ethnographic training, including his claim that “ser- vice learning projects are best accomplished by students who have both prior familiarity with the setting and some basic practical experience in ethnographic fi eld techniques.” While I appreciate Wallace’s perspective as someone who runs a fi eld school for ethnographic methods, I cannot agree that collaboration with host communities and ethnographic fi eld training are necessarily incompatible. I propose instead http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Collaborative Anthropology as Classroom Teaching: The How and the Why

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 8 – Mar 4, 2017

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009

Abstract

Collaborative Anthropology as Classroom Teaching e H Th ow and the Why HOLLY SWYERS, Lake Forest College In 2013 I wrote a piece for Anthropology News advocating for collaborative anthropology as part of classroom instruction. In that piece I described my ongoing collaboration with the Lake Forest– Lake Bluff Historical So- ciety to illustrate the use of externally generated fi eld experiences in the classroom. I have subsequently learned about other collaborative anthro- pologies involving students, ranging from Charles Menzies and Caroline Butler’s collaboration with the Gitxaała Nation (Menzies and Butler 2011) to Susan Hyatt’s contribution to “Anthropologists Back to School 2013” at the aaa annual meeting in Chicago (Hyatt 2014). I have also discovered Tim Wallace’s (2011: 255) critique of the eff ort to combine collaboration or service learning with ethnographic training, including his claim that “ser- vice learning projects are best accomplished by students who have both prior familiarity with the setting and some basic practical experience in ethnographic fi eld techniques.” While I appreciate Wallace’s perspective as someone who runs a fi eld school for ethnographic methods, I cannot agree that collaboration with host communities and ethnographic fi eld training are necessarily incompatible. I propose instead

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Mar 4, 2017

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