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Collaboration Today and the Re-Imagination of the Classic Scene of Fieldwork Encounter

Collaboration Today and the Re-Imagination of the Classic Scene of Fieldwork Encounter douglas r. holmes, Binghamton University george e. marcus, University of California, Irvine Refunctioned ethnography has a more complicated cast of characters than the conversations traditional between the ethnographer and native subjects or informants. In contrast to the bilateral encounter over a camp table, ethnography for present situations is normally if not invariably constituted by the ethnographer, multiple subjects in some relation to one another (what relation may be self-evident, or may have to be discovered by the anthropologist) and liaisons. The contours of ethnographic fieldwork are determined by the relations the ethnographer establishes with the liaisons and the subjects who provide the material critical to the construction of her project. Rather than a sequence of interviews, refunctioned ethnography is much more like what in theater would be an ensemble production, which works through synchronization, or perhaps better, a film montage, in which relations among disparate and apparently disconnected items are established. --David a. Westbrook, Navigators of the Contemporary: Why Ethnography Matters For us "collaboration" represents not some new or revamped practice to be added to the repertoire of methodological tools available to an ethnographer; rather we view collaboration as central to what we have termed a refunctioning of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Collaboration Today and the Re-Imagination of the Classic Scene of Fieldwork Encounter

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 26, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
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Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009
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Abstract

douglas r. holmes, Binghamton University george e. marcus, University of California, Irvine Refunctioned ethnography has a more complicated cast of characters than the conversations traditional between the ethnographer and native subjects or informants. In contrast to the bilateral encounter over a camp table, ethnography for present situations is normally if not invariably constituted by the ethnographer, multiple subjects in some relation to one another (what relation may be self-evident, or may have to be discovered by the anthropologist) and liaisons. The contours of ethnographic fieldwork are determined by the relations the ethnographer establishes with the liaisons and the subjects who provide the material critical to the construction of her project. Rather than a sequence of interviews, refunctioned ethnography is much more like what in theater would be an ensemble production, which works through synchronization, or perhaps better, a film montage, in which relations among disparate and apparently disconnected items are established. --David a. Westbrook, Navigators of the Contemporary: Why Ethnography Matters For us "collaboration" represents not some new or revamped practice to be added to the repertoire of methodological tools available to an ethnographer; rather we view collaboration as central to what we have termed a refunctioning of

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 26, 2008

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