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Collaboration in Archaeological Practice: Engaging Descendant Communities (review)

Collaboration in Archaeological Practice: Engaging Descendant Communities (review) Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh and T. J. Ferguson, eds. Collaboration in Archaeological Practice: Engaging Descendant Communities. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press, 2008. 317 pp. Paper, $34.95. joe watkins, University of Oklahoma Defining "collaboration" as "a range of strategies that seek to link the archaeological enterprise with different publics by working together" (1), the editors have put together a collection of essays that offers a wide "range of strategies." Most of the twelve chapters discuss North American situations, but others include African and Australian examples. And, while the collaborations are between archaeologists and descendant communities, not all are Indigenous groups: in this volume, "descendant community does not strictly refer to biology so much as to a self-identified group of people in the present that link themselves--socially, politically, economically--to a group of people in the past" (2). The first chapter by Michael Adler and Susan Bruning focuses on collaborative research as people and groups involved "constitute and apply the concept of `cultural affiliation' in present-day understandings of the past and present" (35). While "cultural affiliation" may be considered to be "a relationship of shared group identity between two or more groups" (36), that linkage between past and contemporary groups requires an acknowledgment of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Collaborative Anthropologies University of Nebraska Press

Collaboration in Archaeological Practice: Engaging Descendant Communities (review)

Collaborative Anthropologies , Volume 1 (1) – Jan 26, 2008

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Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Nebraska Press
ISSN
2152-4009
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Abstract

Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh and T. J. Ferguson, eds. Collaboration in Archaeological Practice: Engaging Descendant Communities. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press, 2008. 317 pp. Paper, $34.95. joe watkins, University of Oklahoma Defining "collaboration" as "a range of strategies that seek to link the archaeological enterprise with different publics by working together" (1), the editors have put together a collection of essays that offers a wide "range of strategies." Most of the twelve chapters discuss North American situations, but others include African and Australian examples. And, while the collaborations are between archaeologists and descendant communities, not all are Indigenous groups: in this volume, "descendant community does not strictly refer to biology so much as to a self-identified group of people in the present that link themselves--socially, politically, economically--to a group of people in the past" (2). The first chapter by Michael Adler and Susan Bruning focuses on collaborative research as people and groups involved "constitute and apply the concept of `cultural affiliation' in present-day understandings of the past and present" (35). While "cultural affiliation" may be considered to be "a relationship of shared group identity between two or more groups" (36), that linkage between past and contemporary groups requires an acknowledgment of

Journal

Collaborative AnthropologiesUniversity of Nebraska Press

Published: Jan 26, 2008

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