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Variations of Time: The Crafting of Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs through It”

Variations of Time: The Crafting of Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs through It” Variations of Time Th e Crafting of Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs through It” George H. Jensen and Heidi Skurat Harris Far back in the impulses to fi nd this story is a storyteller’s belief that at times life takes on the shape of art and that the remembered remnants of these moments are largely what we come to mean by life. Th e short semihumorous comedies we live, our long certain tragedies, and our springtime lyrics and limericks make up most of what we are. Th ey become almost all of what we remember of ourselves. — Norman Maclean, Young Men and Fire Maclean gives us no reason to make a distinction between real and fi ctional people. Th e stories are so frankly autobiographical that one suspects he hasn’t even bothered to alter names. Th e only thing that has happened to young Maclean’s experience is that it has been recollected in tranquility, seen in perspective, understood, and fully felt. Th e stories are a distillation, almost an exorcism. — Wallace Stegner, “Haunted by Waters” When explaining the origin of A River Runs through It and Other Stories, Norman Maclean wrote that he became an author at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

Variations of Time: The Crafting of Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs through It”

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Variations of Time Th e Crafting of Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs through It” George H. Jensen and Heidi Skurat Harris Far back in the impulses to fi nd this story is a storyteller’s belief that at times life takes on the shape of art and that the remembered remnants of these moments are largely what we come to mean by life. Th e short semihumorous comedies we live, our long certain tragedies, and our springtime lyrics and limericks make up most of what we are. Th ey become almost all of what we remember of ourselves. — Norman Maclean, Young Men and Fire Maclean gives us no reason to make a distinction between real and fi ctional people. Th e stories are so frankly autobiographical that one suspects he hasn’t even bothered to alter names. Th e only thing that has happened to young Maclean’s experience is that it has been recollected in tranquility, seen in perspective, understood, and fully felt. Th e stories are a distillation, almost an exorcism. — Wallace Stegner, “Haunted by Waters” When explaining the origin of A River Runs through It and Other Stories, Norman Maclean wrote that he became an author at

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: May 15, 2020

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