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The Move West: Gary Snyder

The Move West: Gary Snyder Th e Move West Gary Snyder Alan Williamson Th e notion that the West would play a crucial role in my adult life I think fi rst came to me when we were fl ying to California, Elizabeth ten months old, to visit my mother there for the fi rst time. Crossing Wyoming or Colorado, I watched the almost uninhabited green pla- teau tops, separated at intervals by deep valleys, unfold beneath the wings. Such country had been, if rarely deeply penetrated, central to my imagination during the long car trips from Chicago to our summer home in Monterey; these were often the happiest times I spent with my parents in childhood and adolescence. Vaguely I wondered if my heart, and even my poetry, hadn’t lost something from the fact that, as an adult, I saw such landscapes only from airplanes. Th ough I could see no way at the time to remedy this, I wondered if I hadn’t become too much an easterner. Perhaps that too explains my fi rst interest in Gary Snyder. I ac- tually bought Th e Back Country on Fisherman’s Wharf in Monterey, when my father was dying of leukemia in Monterey Peninsula Hos- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

The Move West: Gary Snyder

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (3) – Nov 30, 2017

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Th e Move West Gary Snyder Alan Williamson Th e notion that the West would play a crucial role in my adult life I think fi rst came to me when we were fl ying to California, Elizabeth ten months old, to visit my mother there for the fi rst time. Crossing Wyoming or Colorado, I watched the almost uninhabited green pla- teau tops, separated at intervals by deep valleys, unfold beneath the wings. Such country had been, if rarely deeply penetrated, central to my imagination during the long car trips from Chicago to our summer home in Monterey; these were often the happiest times I spent with my parents in childhood and adolescence. Vaguely I wondered if my heart, and even my poetry, hadn’t lost something from the fact that, as an adult, I saw such landscapes only from airplanes. Th ough I could see no way at the time to remedy this, I wondered if I hadn’t become too much an easterner. Perhaps that too explains my fi rst interest in Gary Snyder. I ac- tually bought Th e Back Country on Fisherman’s Wharf in Monterey, when my father was dying of leukemia in Monterey Peninsula Hos-

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Nov 30, 2017

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