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The Culture of Arboretums, or My Adventures with Tree People

The Culture of Arboretums, or My Adventures with Tree People Th e Culture of Arboretums, or My Adventures with Tree People Cheryll Glotfelty What happens when an ecocritic becomes chair of an arboretum board? Th eory meets ground; ideology squares off with intuition; hermit scholar battles bureaucracy. Th is is the story of how trees have taken over my life and what I’ve learned in the process. First it must be admitted that I am an unlikely arboretum- board chair. I’m an English professor at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and although my title is Professor of Literature and Envi- ronment there are aspects of the environment that I know very lit- tle about. Trees, for example. Nevertheless, I love nature, and when I was nominated to run for chair of the English Department I de- cided to become so tied up with university- level service that chair- ing the English Department would be out of the question. I looked around for a committee to join, but felt only dread for committees such as Academic Standards, Bylaws and Code, Video Surveillance, Dismissal Review, and so many others. Ah, but the Arboretum Board! Th at sounded enticing. And, after having served less than a year on the board, when http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

The Culture of Arboretums, or My Adventures with Tree People

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (3) – Nov 30, 2017

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Th e Culture of Arboretums, or My Adventures with Tree People Cheryll Glotfelty What happens when an ecocritic becomes chair of an arboretum board? Th eory meets ground; ideology squares off with intuition; hermit scholar battles bureaucracy. Th is is the story of how trees have taken over my life and what I’ve learned in the process. First it must be admitted that I am an unlikely arboretum- board chair. I’m an English professor at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), and although my title is Professor of Literature and Envi- ronment there are aspects of the environment that I know very lit- tle about. Trees, for example. Nevertheless, I love nature, and when I was nominated to run for chair of the English Department I de- cided to become so tied up with university- level service that chair- ing the English Department would be out of the question. I looked around for a committee to join, but felt only dread for committees such as Academic Standards, Bylaws and Code, Video Surveillance, Dismissal Review, and so many others. Ah, but the Arboretum Board! Th at sounded enticing. And, after having served less than a year on the board, when

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Nov 30, 2017

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