Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Child and the Latina Immigrant: Reimagining the Southern California Imaginary in Héctor Tobar's The Barbarian Nurseries

The Child and the Latina Immigrant: Reimagining the Southern California Imaginary in Héctor... Th e Child and the Latina Immigrant Reimagining the Southern California Imaginary in Héctor Tobar’s Th e Barbarian Nurseries Sarah Ropp In 2011, when Héctor Tobar’s second novel, Th e Barbarian Nurseries, was published, the United States was in the thick of debates over the reintroduced DREAM act. Th ose opposed to the bill, then and now, have referred to its intended benefi ciaries with dehumanizing terms like “removable aliens” and described them as resource thieves stealing state benefi ts and educational opportunities from “true American” children (Yuhas, Chavez). In the summer of 2014, a few months before I wrote the fi rst draft of this article, anti- immigration protestors in the small southern California town of Murrieta chanted “Not our kids, not our problem!” as buses full of migrant children and their parents rolled into their town for detention and processing (Hansen; “Th e Rachel Maddow Show”). And in the fall of 2018, as I sit revising this article for publication, the embers are still burning from the fi restorm that erupted over the summer in response to the decision of President Donald Trump’s administration to separate undocumented parents from their children at the border. Echoing the Murrieta http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

The Child and the Latina Immigrant: Reimagining the Southern California Imaginary in Héctor Tobar's The Barbarian Nurseries

Western American Literature , Volume 53 (4) – Feb 7, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-western-literature-association/the-child-and-the-latina-immigrant-reimagining-the-southern-california-A0lsyOkOQY
Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Th e Child and the Latina Immigrant Reimagining the Southern California Imaginary in Héctor Tobar’s Th e Barbarian Nurseries Sarah Ropp In 2011, when Héctor Tobar’s second novel, Th e Barbarian Nurseries, was published, the United States was in the thick of debates over the reintroduced DREAM act. Th ose opposed to the bill, then and now, have referred to its intended benefi ciaries with dehumanizing terms like “removable aliens” and described them as resource thieves stealing state benefi ts and educational opportunities from “true American” children (Yuhas, Chavez). In the summer of 2014, a few months before I wrote the fi rst draft of this article, anti- immigration protestors in the small southern California town of Murrieta chanted “Not our kids, not our problem!” as buses full of migrant children and their parents rolled into their town for detention and processing (Hansen; “Th e Rachel Maddow Show”). And in the fall of 2018, as I sit revising this article for publication, the embers are still burning from the fi restorm that erupted over the summer in response to the decision of President Donald Trump’s administration to separate undocumented parents from their children at the border. Echoing the Murrieta

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Feb 7, 2019

There are no references for this article.