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The Brokeback Book: From Story to Cultural Phenomenon (review)

The Brokeback Book: From Story to Cultural Phenomenon (review) Book Reviews 335 no others ever have" come in the first 150 pages of Ken Kesey's Sometimes a Great Notion (1964) (139). Kesey "almost wrote `the Great Northwest novel'" (136). Gastil and Singer find important themes in surprising places, such as a budding Northwest environmentalism in H. L. Davis's 1952 Winds of Morning. They find a classic challenge to western regional identity in Harvey Scott's 1890 History of Portland, Oregon: "The man who heard figurative bands of progressive people marching through Oregon and moving it toward modernity also wanted to hold onto that old pioneer flavor that had made the region unique. This was and remains a characteristically Northwestern dilemma" (44). Though The Pacific Northwest risks becoming an annotated bibliography, the depth of knowledge demonstrated by its authors and their warm and affectionate tone redeem it. They set out to portray how "a regional life and civilization ... was created, experienced, and expressed by the area's notables and by some of its most formidable intellectuals or artists" (173). In their offhand and impressionistic "inventory," they succeed. The Brokeback Book: From Story to Cultural Phenomenon. Edited by William R. Handley. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011. 386 pages, $24.95. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

The Brokeback Book: From Story to Cultural Phenomenon (review)

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 335 no others ever have" come in the first 150 pages of Ken Kesey's Sometimes a Great Notion (1964) (139). Kesey "almost wrote `the Great Northwest novel'" (136). Gastil and Singer find important themes in surprising places, such as a budding Northwest environmentalism in H. L. Davis's 1952 Winds of Morning. They find a classic challenge to western regional identity in Harvey Scott's 1890 History of Portland, Oregon: "The man who heard figurative bands of progressive people marching through Oregon and moving it toward modernity also wanted to hold onto that old pioneer flavor that had made the region unique. This was and remains a characteristically Northwestern dilemma" (44). Though The Pacific Northwest risks becoming an annotated bibliography, the depth of knowledge demonstrated by its authors and their warm and affectionate tone redeem it. They set out to portray how "a regional life and civilization ... was created, experienced, and expressed by the area's notables and by some of its most formidable intellectuals or artists" (173). In their offhand and impressionistic "inventory," they succeed. The Brokeback Book: From Story to Cultural Phenomenon. Edited by William R. Handley. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2011. 386 pages, $24.95.

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Dec 7, 2011

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