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Survivalism, the Jeremiad and the Settler Colonial Utopian Imaginary in James Wesley Rawles’s Survivors: A Novel of the Coming Collapse

Survivalism, the Jeremiad and the Settler Colonial Utopian Imaginary in James Wesley Rawles’s... Survivalism, the Jeremiad and the Settler Colonial Utopian Imaginary in James Wesley Rawles’s Survivors: A Novel of the Coming Collapse Brittany Henry While dystopian fi ction has enjoyed popularity across the twentieth and into the twenty- fi rst century, in recent decades public enthusiasm for the genre has skyrocketed as writers and fi lmmakers have increasingly turned to dystopian and apocalyptic representation to diagnose and warn against a range of social, political, economic, and environmental crises. Western American literature and fi lm have not been immune to the dystopian turn in popular culture, as evidenced by the prevalence of frontier mythology in dystopian and apocalyptic tales (as William Katerburg and Barbara Gurr have both noted) and the frequency with which dystopian and apocalyptic texts choose the US West as their setting or engage tropes of the Western genre in their storytelling. Examples abound but include novels such as Cormac McCarthy’s Th e Road, Octavia Butler’s Parable series, Kim Stanley Robinson’s Th ree Californias Triptych, and Paolo Bacigalupi’s Th e Water Knife, as well as television series and fi lms such as Joss Whedon’s Firefl y and Serenity, George Miller’s Mad Max fi lms, Th e Walking Dead franchise, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

Survivalism, the Jeremiad and the Settler Colonial Utopian Imaginary in James Wesley Rawles’s Survivors: A Novel of the Coming Collapse

Western American Literature , Volume 55 (1) – May 15, 2020

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Survivalism, the Jeremiad and the Settler Colonial Utopian Imaginary in James Wesley Rawles’s Survivors: A Novel of the Coming Collapse Brittany Henry While dystopian fi ction has enjoyed popularity across the twentieth and into the twenty- fi rst century, in recent decades public enthusiasm for the genre has skyrocketed as writers and fi lmmakers have increasingly turned to dystopian and apocalyptic representation to diagnose and warn against a range of social, political, economic, and environmental crises. Western American literature and fi lm have not been immune to the dystopian turn in popular culture, as evidenced by the prevalence of frontier mythology in dystopian and apocalyptic tales (as William Katerburg and Barbara Gurr have both noted) and the frequency with which dystopian and apocalyptic texts choose the US West as their setting or engage tropes of the Western genre in their storytelling. Examples abound but include novels such as Cormac McCarthy’s Th e Road, Octavia Butler’s Parable series, Kim Stanley Robinson’s Th ree Californias Triptych, and Paolo Bacigalupi’s Th e Water Knife, as well as television series and fi lms such as Joss Whedon’s Firefl y and Serenity, George Miller’s Mad Max fi lms, Th e Walking Dead franchise, and

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: May 15, 2020

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