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“Sovereignty”

“Sovereignty” Kirby Brown In social science, political theory, and philosophy, “sovereignty” is variously understood as a power inherent and exclusive to states; as a theory of internal political authority and external independence; and as a more general discourse of claims states make about themselves and their relations to other states (Brierly; Hinsley). It has its origins in late medieval confl icts between church and secular governments, in Renaissance and Enlightenment debates between the divine rights of kings and natural law, and in confl icts between emergent European states competing over lands and resources possessed by peoples they’d never heard of, couldn’t account for, and didn’t understand (Williams, American; Deloria and DeMaille; Deloria and Wilkins). Along with papal bulls and doctrines of discovery and conquest, sovereignty is a foundational principle of international law and forms the basis for understandings of land- as- political- territory and of what constitutes legitimate actors within that system (Brierly; Anghie; Leeds; Jackson). Not surprisingly, sovereignty has been used to rationalize everything from popular revolution and fascist repression to religious confl ict and secular revolt and from imperial conquest and decolonial resistance to political isolationism and expansionist intervention (Hannum; Krasner). In this framing, sovereignty is an origin http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

“Sovereignty”

Western American Literature , Volume 53 (1) – Jun 1, 2018

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Kirby Brown In social science, political theory, and philosophy, “sovereignty” is variously understood as a power inherent and exclusive to states; as a theory of internal political authority and external independence; and as a more general discourse of claims states make about themselves and their relations to other states (Brierly; Hinsley). It has its origins in late medieval confl icts between church and secular governments, in Renaissance and Enlightenment debates between the divine rights of kings and natural law, and in confl icts between emergent European states competing over lands and resources possessed by peoples they’d never heard of, couldn’t account for, and didn’t understand (Williams, American; Deloria and DeMaille; Deloria and Wilkins). Along with papal bulls and doctrines of discovery and conquest, sovereignty is a foundational principle of international law and forms the basis for understandings of land- as- political- territory and of what constitutes legitimate actors within that system (Brierly; Anghie; Leeds; Jackson). Not surprisingly, sovereignty has been used to rationalize everything from popular revolution and fascist repression to religious confl ict and secular revolt and from imperial conquest and decolonial resistance to political isolationism and expansionist intervention (Hannum; Krasner). In this framing, sovereignty is an origin

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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