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Southwest Asia: The Transpacific Geographies of Chicana/o Literature by Jayson Gonzales Sae-Saue (review)

Southwest Asia: The Transpacific Geographies of Chicana/o Literature by Jayson Gonzales Sae-Saue... feeling but was also a site of nonsectarian inclusion. Again, however, Bilbro points out that Muir’s was not a biocentric vision but a theocentric one in which humans must acknowledge their place in God’s plan (73–74). Bilbro locates Cather’s work as part of the Marian tradition, which impels inclusion over individual desire and marks a move from Protestantism to Catholicism. He argues that unlike Thoreau and Muir before her, Cather viewed the western landscape as lapsarian, in need of a human commitment to ensure its restoration, or, in Bilbro’s words, “to lovingly cultivate a reconciled divine family” (127). Cather’s vision forwarded obedience as the source of an environmental ethic. Berry, Bilbro maintains, presents an ethic of care encompassing the ethics of the other three. In Berry, especially, Bilbro locates an ethos of love that binds us to all things, making us responsible for the health of our places. This rewarding book may be difficult for some readers, depending on their personal beliefs. I found Bilbro’s assertions regarding the chief moral authority of God both challenging and disorienting, making many of his claims difficult for me to reconcile. Still, Bilbro’s survey, as it pertains to a community of beings, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

Southwest Asia: The Transpacific Geographies of Chicana/o Literature by Jayson Gonzales Sae-Saue (review)

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (2) – Aug 16, 2017

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142
Publisher site
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Abstract

feeling but was also a site of nonsectarian inclusion. Again, however, Bilbro points out that Muir’s was not a biocentric vision but a theocentric one in which humans must acknowledge their place in God’s plan (73–74). Bilbro locates Cather’s work as part of the Marian tradition, which impels inclusion over individual desire and marks a move from Protestantism to Catholicism. He argues that unlike Thoreau and Muir before her, Cather viewed the western landscape as lapsarian, in need of a human commitment to ensure its restoration, or, in Bilbro’s words, “to lovingly cultivate a reconciled divine family” (127). Cather’s vision forwarded obedience as the source of an environmental ethic. Berry, Bilbro maintains, presents an ethic of care encompassing the ethics of the other three. In Berry, especially, Bilbro locates an ethos of love that binds us to all things, making us responsible for the health of our places. This rewarding book may be difficult for some readers, depending on their personal beliefs. I found Bilbro’s assertions regarding the chief moral authority of God both challenging and disorienting, making many of his claims difficult for me to reconcile. Still, Bilbro’s survey, as it pertains to a community of beings,

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Aug 16, 2017

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